Home Forums Marketplace Table of Contents Events Member List Site Map Register Mark Forums Read



Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums, for communication between foot health professionals about podiatry and related topics.

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members (PM), upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, earn CPD points and access many other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisments in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.


Tags: , , ,

Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

Reply
Submit Thread >  Submit to Digg Submit to Reddit Submit to Furl Submit to Del.icio.us Submit to Google Submit to Yahoo! This Submit to Technorati Submit to StumbleUpon Submit to Spurl Submit to Netscape  < Submit Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 25th November 2004, 06:11 PM
Admin's Avatar
Admin Admin is offline
Administrator
 
About:
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Cyberspace
Posts: 2,733
Join Date: Aug 2004
Marketplace reputation 45% (0)
Thanks: 113
Thanked 398 Times in 196 Posts
Arrow Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

Podiatry Arena members do not see these ads
This whole saga surrounding this has been fascinating. Now this has appeared on UK TV, as reported by the British Medical Journal:
Quote:
The gastroenterologist Dr Andrew Wakefield had filed patent applications for a measles vaccine and a cure for autism nine months before his study on childhood chronic enterocolitis and autism was published in the Lancet in 1998, a television documentary claimed last week. Dr Wakefield's paper led to suggestions of a link between the MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine and autism.


Channel 4's Dispatches also included an interview with a researcher in Dr Wakefield's laboratory, Dr Nick Chadwick, who said he had not detected live measles virus in the guts or cerebrospinal fluid of any of the children examined for the Lancet study.

Freelance journalist Brian Deer, who made and presented the programme, MMR: What They Didn't Tell You, asked Dr Wakefield to comment on these claims on camera, but he declined to do so. Instead Dr Wakefield issued a statement on the internet in which he said that Mr Deer's claims were "demonstrably false" and that because there had been "no objectivity in the manner of their intended portrayal, I declined to participate in any way in the making of the... programme"
.Latest on this story...
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 25th November 2004, 06:34 PM
Admin's Avatar
Admin Admin is offline
Administrator
 
About:
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Cyberspace
Posts: 2,733
Join Date: Aug 2004
Marketplace reputation 45% (0)
Thanks: 113
Thanked 398 Times in 196 Posts
Arrow

Here is a supporter of the link between MMR vaccine and autism:
{link no longer live}

Personally and IMHO, the peak age of onset of autism is exactly the same as the age that the MMR vaccine is given:( .... so why do so many jump to the causation conclusion - this is epidemiology 101.

Here is some more:
MMR Links to 170 Cases of Autism
Autism, MMR vaccine link dismissed in study

The reason I am so fascinated by the debate, is because of this:
Public 'duped' by media on vaccine fear

Last edited by Admin : 10th June 2007 at 03:10 PM.
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10th June 2007, 03:08 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,966
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 594 Times in 481 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

This story has taken a turn:

Reuters are reporting:
Washington court will hear autism-vaccine suits
June 10, 2007 02:23:00 PM PST
Quote:
A special court that will pit scientists against activists in the debate over whether vaccines have caused autism in many children begins hearings on Monday with the first test case, involving a 12-year-old Arizona girl.

Although science has weighed in heavily on the question -- with strong evidence that vaccines are not linked to the disease -- a very vocal group of people remains unconvinced.

More than 4,800 cases are pending, filed by parents who believe their children have autism that was caused by vaccines. The little-known U.S. Court of Federal Claims has set up an omnibus hearing in Washington, D.C., with the first case expected to last three weeks.

The parents are seeking payment under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, a no-fault system that has a $2.5 billion fund built up from a 75-cent-per-dose tax on vaccines.

"Monday will mark the first time ever that evidence of autistic harm from childhood vaccines is examined and cross-examined in a court of law"; activist David Kirby, who wrote a book about the purported vaccine and autism link, said in a statement.

No judges but instead three 'special masters'; will hear the test cases. They are Denise Vowell, a former U.S. Army chief trial judge; Patricia Campbell-Smith, a former environmental lawyer and clerk at the Federal Claims Court; and George Hastings a former tax claims expert at the Department of Justice.

The first test case will ask whether a combination vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella, or MMR, plus a mercury-containing preservative called thimerosal, caused the autism of Michelle Cedillo, now 12.

"The profound downward change in Michelle's health began seven days following the MMR"; the Legal Times newspaper quoted Michelle's mother Theresa Cedillo as saying.

TRAUMATIC SHOTS

Vaccine experts say parents often link vaccines with their children's symptoms because getting a shot can be upsetting, and children are vaccinated at an age when autism and related disorders are often first diagnosed.

They point to two Institute of Medicine reports, in 2001 and 2004, that reviewed the evidence and determined there was no link between vaccines and autism.

"From my standpoint, this question has been asked and answered" Dr. Paul Offitt of the Philadelphia Children's Hospital, who helped invent a rotavirus vaccine, told reporters in a telephone briefing.

"You know, it's a scientific question. It's best answered in a scientific venue. It's been done. I mean, the court is not a place to determine scientific truths. The court is a place to settle disputes"

Dr. Peter Hotez of the Sabin Vaccine Institute said he is confident his daughter's autism was not caused by any vaccines.

"Even if we could turn back the clock and do it all over again, I can honestly say that we would still give Rachel her full complement of pediatric vaccines and our confidence in this is based on what we know about autism" Hotez told reporters in the same briefing.

Offitt and Hotez say many studies show that children who have been vaccinated are no more likely to develop autism than children who have not been vaccinated. And they note that although thimerosal was removed from all childhood vaccines in the United States, except flu vaccines, by 2002, rates of autism have continued to climb.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that about one in every 150 children has autism or a related disorder such as Asperger's syndrome.

The CDC estimates that about 560,000 people up to age 21 in the United States have autism, which can severely disable a child by interfering with speech and behavior.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 7th January 2008, 07:44 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,966
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 594 Times in 481 Posts
Default Another twist...

CTV are reporting:
Study casts doubt on autism-vaccine link
Quote:
Autism cases in California continued to climb even after a mercury-rich vaccine preservative that some people blame for the neurological disorder was removed from routine childhood shots, a new study found.

Researchers from the state Department of Public Health found the autism rate in children rose continuously during the 12-year study period from 1995 to 2007. The preservative thimerosal hasn't been used in childhood vaccines since 2001, but is used in some flu shots.

Doctors say the latest study adds to existing evidence refuting a link between thimerosal exposure and autism risk and should reassure parents that the disorder is not caused by vaccinations. If there was a risk, they said, autism rates should have dropped between 2004 and 2007.

The findings show "no evidence of mercury poisoning in autism" since there was no decline in autism rates even after the elimination of thimerosal, said Dr. Eric Fombonne, an autism researcher at Montreal Children's Hospital who had no role in the research.

Some advocacy groups blame thimerosal for the impaired social interaction typical of autism. Nearly 5,000 claims alleging a vaccine-autism link have been lodged with the U.S. government, which is deciding whether victims should receive compensation from a government fund.

Dr. Daniel Geschwind, a neurologist at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, said the focus now should be on exploring the causes of autism such as possible genetic links.

"Something else must be at play and we need to know what that is if we're really serious about preventing autism," said Geschwind, who had no connection with the study.

For their study, California public health officials calculated the autism rate by analyzing a database of state-funded centres that care for people with autism and other developmental disorders. ...
Full story
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 8th January 2008, 05:35 AM
Robertisaacs's Avatar
Robertisaacs Robertisaacs is offline
Podiatry Arena Veteran
 
About:
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Kent
Posts: 4,290
Join Date: May 2006
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 454
Thanked 911 Times in 526 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

Quote:
Nearly 5,000 claims alleging a vaccine-autism link have been lodged with the U.S. government, which is deciding whether victims should receive compensation from a government fund.


Hmmm. Seek ye first the people who stand to make profit and the impetus for the story will not be far away.

Mere science and fact must make way for the almighty tort. The kid has Autism. It must be SOMEBODIES fault!

Such is life.

The Arena ettes must be about due. So Craig, autism or measles?

Regards
Robert
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 17th January 2008, 04:41 PM
zaffie's Avatar
zaffie zaffie is offline
Senior Member
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Kent
Posts: 51
Join Date: Jan 2005
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 5
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

Food for thought

I am aware of Dr Fombonne and Dr Wakefields research and ideas.

I declare a personal interest as my son has autism.

He was different from birth and he did have the MMR made no difference to him at all. But I did decline the second MMR that Dr surgery was pushing hard. I was told at the time that 20% of of children had not developed immunity from vaccine.

In America the label of "autism" attracts all manner of funding for education etc. I believe Dr Fombonne has made this point that autism is over diagnosed in America because of the dollars that follow it

People remember the BSE scandal and don't believe what their governments now say

I for one remain firmly on the fence

I am also aware of a number of children that were completely "normal" before MMR then developed Autism. Anecdotal perhaps but don't forget it is not that long ago that Autism was "caused" by "refrigerator mother syndrome"
__________________
Zaffie
My location
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 18th January 2008, 12:53 AM
Craig Payne's Avatar
Craig Payne Craig Payne is offline
Moderator
Professor of Life, The Universe and Everything
 
About:
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 4,976
Join Date: Aug 2004
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 96
Thanked 865 Times in 596 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

I use the MMR vaccine/Autism debate as a case study in the undergraduate paediatrics teachings for a number a reasons - mainly due to the way the media takes this story; also becasue its a topical public health issue; but also it goes back to epidemiology 101.
__________________
Craig Payne
__________________________________________________ ___________________________________
Follow me on Twitter | Run Junkie | Latest Blog Post: Review of Lieberman et al’s (2010) paper in Nature on Barefoot Running
God put me on this earth to accomplish a certain number of things - right now I am so far behind, I will never die.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 2nd February 2008, 02:19 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,966
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 594 Times in 481 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

Here is the latest from CTV:
Controversy over vaccine-autism link endures
Quote:
The belief that routine childhood vaccines can lead to autism remains one of the most stubbornly enduring.

The mainstream medical community insists there is no evidence to support the theory, and cite study after study that have found no link. Yet the Internet is filled with groups and organizations who insist that vaccines are causing children to become autistic.

The controversy returned to the headlines this week, when the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a call for ABC to cancel the debut episode of "Eli Stone," a new legal drama that also airs on CTV.

The episode featured a lawyer who argued in court that a vaccine caused a child's autism. The episode ends with the jury awarding the mother US$5.2 million after it is revealed the CEO of the vaccine-maker kept his own daughter from getting the company's vaccine because of autism concerns.

The AAP, which represents 60,000 U.S. pediatricians, noted that while the show included statements that numerous studies have refuted any link between autism and vaccines, the episode's conclusion leaves audiences "with the destructive idea that vaccines do cause autism."

ABC chose not to cancel the episode, but ran a disclaimer at the opening of the show stating the story is fictional. A message at the end referred viewers to a U.S. Centers for Disease Control website for information about autism.

The AAP has long campaigned against the misinformation linking vaccines to autism and has even dedicated a section of its website to clarify its position on the controversy. So how did this debate begin?

Study ignites controversy
It started in February, 1998, in the highly prestigious, British-based medical journal, The Lancet. There, British gastroenterologist Dr. Andrew Wakefield, along with 12 co-authors, published a small study on 12 children in which he claimed to have found a link between inflammatory bowel disease, autism and the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine introduced across the U.K. in 1988.

Most agreed that further research was needed and that parents should continue to have their children vaccinated with MMR. But, in the huge media feeding frenzy that followed, Wakefield suggested that parents should stop taking the vaccine and opt instead for each vaccine on its own.

That led to an almost immediate drop in immunization rates. Within a few years, MMR vaccination rates sunk to 75 per cent in Britain, well below the 95 per cent authorities say is needed to keep these diseases from circulating.

While the rate has since climbed to about 85 per cent, Britain continues to suffer outbreaks of these three diseases. In fact, it's suspected that a recent widespread outbreak of mumps in Canada was sparked by a single infection from Britain. And in March, 2006, a 13-year-old boy who had not been given the MMR vaccine became the first person in Britain in 14 years to die of measles.

Wakefield's research was attacked as flawed almost from the beginning. In fact, even his collaborators changed their minds. In 2004, 10 of Wakefield's 12 co-authors retracted their conclusions in the Lancet study. They stated:

"We wish to make it clear that in this paper no causal link was established between (the) vaccine and autism, as the data were insufficient. However the possibility of such a link was raised, and consequent events have had major implications for public health. In view of this, we consider now is the appropriate time that we should together formally retract the interpretation placed upon these findings in the paper, according to precedent."

Shortly before publishing the retraction, Lancet editor Dr. Richard Horton declared Wakefield had a "fatal" conflict of interest that his team was not aware of. Wakefield was doing paid research for a group of parents of autistic children who were trying to mount a class-action suit against the makers of the MMR vaccine.

Conflicts of interest?
Had his team known about those conflicts, Horton said he would never have published the study.

But even while Wakefield's theory on the cause of autism was losing credibility, a revised theory was emerging.

In 2003, David and Mark Geier, a father-and-son research team began publishing studies in a number of small journals in which they reported finding an association between thimerosal-containing vaccines and autism. They concluded that it wasn't the vaccines itself causing the illness, but the mercury-based thimerosal, which is used as a preservative.

The Geier studies might have been ignored if not for the fact that a few years earlier, in 1999, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) asked vaccine-makers to remove thimerosal from vaccines as quickly as possible. This move came after they realized that since 1991, children receiving routine vaccines had been getting amounts of thimerosal that might push them over accepted levels of mercury.

The move was said to be simply cautionary. But it sparked confusion and led some to declare there had been a government cover-up of a widespread health risk. Shortly after, the lawsuits against vaccine-makers was launched.

The debate moved mainstream when such celebrities as Jenny McCarthy and Bobby Kennedy Jr. began insisting that the link between vaccines and autism was clear and that vaccine-makers were refusing to accept responsibility.

Since then, numerous large, peer-reviewed studies have been published that have found no link. The most recent came earlier this year. Researchers from the California Department of Public Health Autism found that the reporting of autism cases in that state continued to climb even after from 1995 to 2007 -- long after thimerosal was removed from routine childhood shots. Doctors noted that if the vaccines really were causing autism, rates should have dropped.

Despite the many studies pouring cold water on the anti-vaccine side, the debate continues 10 years later, with dozens of websites across the Internet encouraging parents to refuse to allow their children to be vaccinated.

Sadly, while the voices of those parents who have defied general medical advice ring loud, the voices of those parents who have watched their children die or become disabled from such diseases as polio, meningitis, and hepatitis are rarely heard. Vaccination has been called the single greatest medical intervention over the past century and has saved so many lives that most of us have never seen the diseases they prevent. Yet, many parents still choose not to vaccinate their children.

Since his 1998 study, Wakefield has lost his position with the British National Health Service and now works for a non-profit centre for autistic children in Texas, called Thoughtful House. While he continues to assert that the results of his 1998 study are still valid, the General Medical Council, the British body that investigates alleged malpractice by doctors, decided to take action.

This past July, the GMC began hearings into allegations that Wakefield and two colleagues behaved unethically and dishonestly in conducting their research. The hearings had been expected to last months but after the prosecution case was presented, the panel suspended proceedings and defence presentation until March, 2008.

Shortly before those hearings began, Wakefield agreed to an interview with U.K.'s The Observer, which he ended by declaring: "My colleagues and I won't be deflected by the interests of public health policymakers and pharmaceuticals. I want to help children with autism; they are my motivation. If the work ultimately exonerates the vaccines, that's fine. If not, we need to think again."
Full story and comments.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 5th February 2008, 12:16 AM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,966
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 594 Times in 481 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

Another study show no link:

The BBC are reporting:
MMR 'does not trigger reaction'
Quote:
The jab has been highly controversial
Children with autism do not react differently to other youngsters to the MMR jab, a study shows.
London's Guy's and St Thomas's Hospital found no difference in the immune response to the jab in a study of 240 children aged between 10 and 12.

Fears about a link between the two were first raised in 1998, prompting a drop in uptake of the vaccine, but that research has now been discredited.

Studies since have shown there is no link and that has been confirmed again.

The research, partly funded by the Department of Health and published in the Archives of Disease in Childhood, is the largest of its kind.

Previous studies have mainly looked for a possible link by examining autism trends in large groups of populations.

But the Guy's and St Thomas's team analysed blood samples of 240 children aged 10 to 12 to see if the MMR jab had caused an abnormal immune response that could have triggered autism.

This would have been indicated by increased antibody levels, but the researchers found no difference in the three groups they studied - children with autism, those without and those with special educational needs.

While all the children had had the first MMR jab, not all of them went on to have the second needed for maximum immunity.

The children who developed autism or special educational needs were the most likely not to have had the follow up jab - an indication of the public suspicion surrounding the safety of MMR.

Researcher Dr David Brown said: "The study found no evidence linking MMR to autistic spectrum disorder and the paper adds to the overwhelming body of evidence from around the world supporting the use of MMR."

The Lancet medical journal published research by Dr Andrew Wakefield suggesting a link between the jab and the condition in 1998.

Claims:
The journal subsequently distanced itself from the study of 12 children after it emerged Dr Wakefield had received funding to support legal action by a group of parents who claimed their children were damaged by the vaccine.

Dr Andrew Wakefield is currently appearing before the General Medical Council on charges relating to the claims.

But all this was after the publication had had an impact. The up-take of the triple-jab slumped in the immediate aftermath and is still under the 95% needed for herd immunity in some places, particularly London.

The number of confirmed measles cases has risen from 56 in 1998 in England and Wales to just under 1,000 in 2007, according to provisional data.

However, the impact of MMR on these figures is not clear.

Professor David Salisbury, director of immunisation at the Department of Health, said: "It's natural for parents to worry about the health and well-being of their children and I hope that this study will reassure them that there is no evidence linking the MMR vaccine to autism."

But Jackie Fletcher, from Jabs campaign group, said the conclusions were misleading.

"It is making a leap from having the actual data on the antibodies and saying MMR does not cause autism."
Full story
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 26th March 2008, 05:13 AM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,966
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 594 Times in 481 Posts
Default Study explores delicate issue of discussing autism

To tell or not to tell?

More...
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 27th March 2008, 08:00 AM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,966
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 594 Times in 481 Posts
Default Getting help for a child with autism

Learning that your child has autism is a life-changing moment. The sooner you can confirm the diagnosis, the better your child's chances for effective treatment. This week's Empowered Patient offers advice for getting help for your child with autism at every stage, from confirming the diagnosis to dealing with insurance to educational support.

More...

Last edited by NewsBot : 7th April 2008 at 01:07 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 31st March 2008, 08:10 AM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,966
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 594 Times in 481 Posts
Default Autism's mysteries remain as numbers grow

It remains one of the greatest mysteries of medicine. Although autism will be diagnosed in more than 25,000 children this year, more than new cases of AIDS, diabetes and cancer combined, scientists and doctors still know very little about the neurological disorder.
More...

Last edited by NewsBot : 7th April 2008 at 01:09 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 2nd April 2008, 06:50 AM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,966
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 594 Times in 481 Posts
Default Vaccine-autism link divides parents, scientists

At 13, Michelle Cedillo can't speak, wears a diaper and requires round-the-clock monitoring in case she has a seizure. She has no idea she is at the center of a court case pitting thousands of families of children with autism against the medical establishment.

More...

Last edited by NewsBot : 7th April 2008 at 01:09 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 7th April 2008, 01:08 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,966
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 594 Times in 481 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

ScienceDaily are reporting:
Parents Follow Pediatrician Advice On Administering MMR Vaccinations
Quote:
News stories about an allegedly harmful link between the mumps, measles and rubella vaccine and the onset of autism had little effect on whether U.S. parents immunized their children, according to a review of immunization records and news stories. Parents' decisions were more likely influenced by recommendations from their child's pediatrician, the researchers said.

Researchers from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and The University of Louisville School of Medicine report on the review of data in the April issue of the journal Pediatrics. The data was collected from public-use files of the National Immunization Survey from 1995 to 2004. It compared immunization records of 215,643 children ages 19 months to 35 months with spikes in news stories about the MMR vaccine and autism. The news accounts were gathered from a database known as LexisNexis, which tracks newspaper, television and radio news.

The number of children not receiving the mumps, measles and rubella vaccine (known as MMR) increased after February 1998, when a scientific study proposing a link between the MMR vaccine and autism appeared in the British journal The Lancet. After two years, the U.S. numbers of unvaccinated children then declined and did not rebound when the MMR-autism link started to receive widespread coverage in the mainstream press, suggesting a limited influence of news media on MMR immunization rates in the U.S.

"If providers become more cautious during a period of controversy, then public health officials should insure providers are given timely advisories and access to credible recommendations," said Michael J. Smith, M.D, lead author of the study while formerly at Children's Hospital. Smith is now a pediatric infectious disease specialist at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. "Our findings suggest that physicians may have been an important buffer against the potential negative impact of media coverage of immunization controversies."

The Lancet study, led by Andrew Wakefield, was flawed and later discredited, although widely publicized in the United Kingdom. National rates of MMR immunization in Britain fell from 92 percent to 73 percent following publication, resulting in measles outbreaks and the first measles death in the U.K. in more than a decade.

The Children's Hospital study set out to provide the first population estimates of MMR vaccination rates in the U.S. following publication of the Wakefield study and its subsequent media coverage. According to the data, nearly 1 in 50 U.S. children missed the opportunity for MMR immunization in the two years following the Wakefield publication. In private physician practices non-immunization rose as high as 1 in 40 children....
Full story
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 11th April 2008, 07:30 AM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,966
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 594 Times in 481 Posts
Default MMR doctor admits ethics failing

The doctor who sparked the MMR contoversy admits a poor grasp of medical ethics in relation to children.

More...
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 12th May 2008, 08:00 AM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,966
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 594 Times in 481 Posts
Default Families argue autism-vaccine link in court

Read full story for latest details.

More...

Last edited by NewsBot : 13th May 2008 at 12:49 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 13th May 2008, 12:50 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,966
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 594 Times in 481 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

CTV.ca are reporting:
Families make case for vaccine link to autism
Quote:
Parents claiming that childhood vaccines cause autism should not be rewarded by the courts when the scientific community has already rejected any link, government lawyers argued Monday on the first day of a hearing in United States federal court.

Overall, nearly 4,900 families have filed claims with the U.S. Court of Claims alleging that vaccines caused autism and other neurological problems in their children. Lawyers for the families are presenting three different theories of how vaccines caused autism. The theory at issue Monday was whether vaccines containing the preservative thimerosal caused autism.

Lynn Ricciardella, a Justice Department lawyer, said that theory has not moved beyond the realm of speculation. She said that the Institute of Medicine and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have rejected any link between thimerosal and autism.

"There is no scientific debate," Ricciardella said. "The debate is over."

Autism is a developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life and affects a person's ability to communicate and interact with others. Medical experts don't have a comprehensive understanding of what causes autism, but they do know there is a strong hereditary component.

Thimerosal has been removed in recent years from standard childhood vaccines, except flu vaccines that are not packaged in single doses. The CDC says single-dose flu shots currently are available only in limited quantities.

Under a two-decades-old program, individuals claiming injury from a vaccine must file a petition for "no-fault" compensation with the U.S. Court of Federal Claims. The secretary of Health and Human Services replaces the vaccine manufacturer or vaccine administrator to defend the claim.

Two 10-year-old boys from Portland, Ore., will serve as test cases to determine whether thousands of families can be compensated. Attorneys for the boys will try to show they were happy, healthy and developing normally -- but, after being exposed to vaccines with thimerosal, they began to regress.

To win, the attorneys for the two boys, William Mead and Jordan King, will have to show that it's more likely than not that the vaccine actually caused the injury, which they described as regressive autism.

Tom Powers, one of the boys' attorneys, acknowledged that the evidence showing thimerosal led to regressive autism was indirect and circumstantial. Still, it's clear in the case of the two boys that they did not show any symptoms of autism until after they had received all their immunizations.

"Each of them had developed normally and typically well after their first year in life," Powers said.

The attorneys for the two boys said that a study in monkeys showed that mercury could ignite "neuroinflammation" in the brain, and such inflammation is the hallmark of somebody with autism. They also noted that previous studies of thimerosal were focused on autism, rather than on a more rare, specific form of the disorder that they described as regressive autism.

The first witness for the families, Sander Greenland, a professor at the UCLA School of Public Health, said published studies he reviewed failed to separate regressive autism from other types of autism when looking at thimerosal, thus they allow for a substantial association of the vaccines with clearly regressive autism.

Under the vaccine compensation program, officials titled special masters serve as the trial judges. The hearing that began Monday involved three special masters who will hear the evidence and determine whether thimerosal belongs on the list of causes for regressive autism. The rulings are appealable to the Court of Federal Claims.

If the families are successful, they could be entitled to damages that cover lost income after one turns 18 and up to $250,000 for pain and suffering.

Many members of the medical community are skeptical of the families' claims. They worry that the claims about the dangers of vaccines could cause some people to forgo vaccines that prevent illness.

Ricciardella argued that a marketing consultant fanned publicity about the supposed link between thimerosal and autism in a journal called Medical Hypothesis. She described the journal as willing to publish radical ideas, so long as they are coherent. She also said the authors pay to have the article published.

But Powers said those questioning conventional wisdom in the case cannot be easily dismissed.

"These are doctors who are willing to challenge the establishment on behalf of their patients," Powers said.

The court web site says more than 12,500 claims have been filed since creation of the program in 1987, including more than 5,300 autism cases, and more than $1.7 billion has been paid in claims. It says there is now more than $2.7 billion in a trust fund supported by an excise tax on each dose of vaccine covered by the program.
Full story
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 3rd September 2008, 07:50 PM
RSSFeedBot RSSFeedBot is offline
I, Robot
 
About:
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 10,185
Join Date: Jul 2008
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
CPD Points: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 41 Times in 41 Posts
Default Study: No link between measles vaccine, autism

The Measles-Mumps-Rubella vaccine causes neither autism nor gastrointestinal disorders, a study reported Tuesday, disputing a theory that has persisted for a decade.

More...

Last edited by Admin : 3rd October 2008 at 04:26 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 3rd October 2008, 04:28 PM
Admin's Avatar
Admin Admin is offline
Administrator
 
About:
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Cyberspace
Posts: 2,733
Join Date: Aug 2004
Marketplace reputation 45% (0)
Thanks: 113
Thanked 398 Times in 196 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

This story just won't go away:

ScienceDaily Are reporting:
Parents Still Fear Autism Could Be Linked To Vaccines, Poll Shows
Quote:
ScienceDaily (Oct. 3, 2008) — The first national survey of attitudes toward autism reveals that a small but significant percentage of people still believe the disease is caused by childhood vaccines. The survey of 1000 randomly selected adults was conducted for the Florida Institute of Technology.

Nearly one in four (24 percent) said that because vaccines may cause autism it was safer not to have children vaccinated at all. Another 19 percent were not sure. This at a time when the Centers for Disease Control reports that autism affects one in 150 children born in the United States.

Scientists say there is no evidence linking vaccines and autism, but the lingering fear is leading to fewer parents having their children vaccinated and a growing number of measles infections. The New York Times reported in August that measles cases in the first seven months of 2008 grew at the fastest rate in more than a decade and cases in Britain, Switzerland, Israel and Italy are said to be soaring.

The public's concern over vaccines stems from a controversial 1998 British study linking autism and the MMR vaccine, which at the time contained the mercury-based preservative thimerosal. The study was later retracted by most of its authors and thimerosal was removed from all childhood vaccines in 2001, but responses to the just-completed survey show the public is still confused.

Florida Institute of Technology commissioned the survey, which asked specifically about the link between the preservative and autism. Nineteen percent of the respondents agreed with the statement "Autism is caused by a preservative once found in childhood vaccines." An additional 43 percent were not sure, meaning fewer than half (38 percent) of the respondents believe no link exists between the vaccine and autism.

Part of the confusion may stem from the fact that the cause of autism is unknown, according to Florida Tech Assistant Professor of Psychology Celeste Harvey. More than three in four respondents (76 percent) to the national survey agree with the statement: "At this time, scientists don't know exactly what causes autism."

"Fear of the unknown, coupled with anxiety over the growing incidence of the disease, may be leading people to draw their own conclusions," said Harvey.

The first national survey of the public's knowledge and understanding of Autism was conducted for the School of Psychology at Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Fla. The survey includes responses from 1000 men and women, 21 years old or older, randomly selected from throughout the nation. The poll has a plus or minus 3.1 percent confidence interval at a 95 percent level of confidence. The telephone interviews were conducted between August 1 and August 29 by GDA Education Research, Mount Pleasant, S.C.

In addition to asking whether a link exists between autism and childhood vaccines, the survey explored people's knowledge of the disease, their exposure to people with autism and their support for early intervention programs.
Link to story
__________________
Forum Rules | FAQ's
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 30th November 2008, 05:07 AM
Admin's Avatar
Admin Admin is offline
Administrator
 
About:
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Cyberspace
Posts: 2,733
Join Date: Aug 2004
Marketplace reputation 45% (0)
Thanks: 113
Thanked 398 Times in 196 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

I recently read a copy of this book on the topic of this thread. Its is also relevant in the context of the recent debates we have had in the biomechanics forum. Highly recommended.

Autism's False Prophets: Bad Science, Risky Medicine, and the Search for a Cure
Paul A. Offit



Buy:
Amazon.com (USA)
Amazon.ca (Canada)
Amazon.co.uk (United Kingdom)
Fishpond.com.au (Australia)
Fishpond.co.nz (New Zealand)

Quote:
From Publishers Weekly
Attempting to answer the enormous frustration and unhappiness of parents "tired of watching their autistic children improve at rates so slow it's hard to tell if they are improving at all," pediatrics professor and vaccine researcher Offit explores purported causes and cures. Examining false approaches like facilitated communication ("a massive, nationwide delusion") and secretin injections ("no better than salt water"), and mistaken theories of origin (the MMR vaccine, thimerosol), Offit pleads with journalists to resist the lure of "dramatic headlines, advertising dollars, and ratings" rather than report an unconfirmed or untrustworthy study. The only worthwhile studies, Offit purports, are those meeting three criteria: "transparency of the funding source, internal consistency of the data, and reproducibility of the findings." Overall, Offit's text seems unbalanced: though he takes on the "$40-billion-a-year" alternative medicine industry, he's largely silent on the much larger pharmaceutical industry; and after 10 chapters of debunking the "false prophets," there's just one brief chapter on what is known about autism causes and cures. A thorough and convincing debunker, however, Offit will likely leave parents still hunting for information, albeit better armed to find it.

Reviews
"[A] thoughtful and readable study." -- Library Journal (starred review) "Enlightening, highly readable and... timely." -- Rahul K. Parikh, M.D., Salon.com "Arguably the most courageous and most knowledgeable scientist about vaccines in the United States." -- Robert Goldberg, New York Post "[Dr. Offit] has done a huge public service by exposing the tragic and dangerous place the anti-vaccine hysteria has taken us." -- Huntly Collins, Philadelphia Inquirer "An invaluable chronicle that relates some of the many ways in which the vulnerabilities of anxious parents have been exploited." -- Linda Seebach, Wall Street Journal "A good read and an important piece of work." -- Lisa Jo Rudy, About.com "More than a book about a disease, it is an ode to uncorrupted science and a cautionary tale that data alone is never enough." -- SEED magazine

A definitive analysis of a dangerous and unnecessary controversy that has put the lives of children at risk. Paul A. Offit shows how bad science can take hold of the public consciousness and lead to personal decisions that endanger the health of small children. Every parent who has doubts about the wisdom of vaccinating their kids should read this book. -- Peter C. Doherty, Ph.D., St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital and Nobel Laureate in Medicine for fundamental contributions in Immunology

As a parent it is my job to protect my children. Hearing all the rumors about vaccine side effects made me question the right thing to do. This book makes it clear that vaccines save lives, and that they clearly do not cause autism. -- Amy Pisani, mother

In his latest book Paul A. Offit unfolds the story of autism, infectious diseases, and immunization that has captivated our attention for the last decade. His lively account explores the intersection of science, special interests, and personal courage. It is provocative reading for anyone whose life has been touched by the challenge of autism spectrum disorders. -- Susan K. Klein, MD, Ph.D., Case Western Reserve Hospital, and Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Case Medical Center

No one has been more vocal-or courageous-than Paul A. Offit in exposing the false and dangerous claims of the growing antivaccine movement. Offit's latest book lays waste to the supposed link between autism and vaccination while showing how easily Americans have been bamboozled into compromising the health of their own children. Autism's False Prophets is a must read for parents seeking to fully understand the risks and rewards of vaccination in our modern world. -- David Oshinsky, winner of the Pulitzer Prize in History for Polio: An American Story
__________________
Forum Rules | FAQ's
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 12th February 2009, 12:35 AM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,966
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 594 Times in 481 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

CNN are reporting:
Rulings on autism-vaccination connection expected
Quote:
A Department of Justice special court will hand down rulings Thursday in cases asking whether certain vaccines cause autism, the lead plaintiffs' attorney told CNN Wednesday.

A panel of "special masters" will issue decisions on three test cases heard in 2007 involving children with autism that their parents contend was triggered by early childhood vaccination, said attorney Thomas Powers.

The parents seek compensation, saying the "combined" exposure to thimerosal, a mercury-containing preservative, in some vaccines and the MMR vaccine led to autism, he said.

The three families -- the Cedillos, the Hazelhursts and the Snyders -- have been notified of the development, as have the more than 180 lawyers collectively representing the 4,800 families with claims in the Vaccine Court Omnibus Autism Proceeding, Powers said.

At 14, Michelle Cedillo can't speak, wears a diaper and requires round-the-clock monitoring in case she has a seizure. Her parents say their only child was a happy, engaged toddler who responded to her name, said "mommy" and "daddy" and was otherwise normal until at 15 months she received a measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine combined with thimerosal, found in that and other vaccines a the time.

The other two families described similar alterations in their children's development after receiving vaccinations in their first two years of life.

The government argued during the 2007 bench trials that the plaintiffs' claims linking the vaccines with autism are not supported by "good science."

Likewise, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization and the Institute of Medicine have found no credible link between vaccinations and autism.

Powers' litigation steering committee is representing thousands of families that fall into three categories: those that claim MMR vaccines and thimerosal-containing vaccines can combine to cause autism; those who claim thimerosal-containing vaccines alone can cause autism; and those who claim MMR vaccines, without any link to thimerosal, can cause autism.

Thursday's rulings will only affect the families that fall under the first category, Powers said.

Since 2001, thousands of parents with autistic children have filed petitions seeking compensation with Vaccine Injury Compensation Program at the Department of Health and Humans Services.

By mid-2008, more than 5,300 cases were filed in the program -- 5,000 of those await adjudication, according to the agency.
Link to full story
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 12th February 2009, 12:54 AM
LuckyLisfranc's Avatar
LuckyLisfranc LuckyLisfranc is offline
Podiatry Arena Veteran
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: The Restaurant at the End of the Universe
Posts: 923
Join Date: Jan 2005
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 9
Thanked 284 Times in 181 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

I think this sums it up for me:
Attached Images
File Type: jpg mmr[1].jpg (37.6 KB, 445 views)
__________________
*****************************************
Remember, it's just a foot.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 12th February 2009, 09:10 AM
heleneaustin's Avatar
heleneaustin heleneaustin is offline
Member
 
About:
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: MAIDSTONE, KENT
Posts: 29
Join Date: Jun 2008
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

How true LuckyLinsfranc statement is.
__________________
HELENEAUSTIN
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 12th February 2009, 12:58 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,966
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 594 Times in 481 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

The rulings is in:

WebMD are reporting:
Vaccine Court Rejects Autism Claims
Quote:
The federal "vaccine court" has rejected claims that either the measles/mumps/rubella vaccine or thimerosal in vaccines caused children's autism.

The vaccine court -- shorthand for the Office of Special Masters of the U.S. Court of Federal Claims -- administers a system that since 1988 has overseen all claims for compensation due to injury from vaccinations.

Today's ruling is a major setback for the more than 5,000 cases in which families claim that the MMR vaccine, either alone or due to the mercury-based thimerosal preservative in the vaccine, caused a child's autism.

Lawyers for the families and Department of Health and Human Services (the defendant in the suit) agreed to argue three test cases. In these cases, the vaccine court agreed to decide whether there was sufficient evidence to blame vaccines for autism -- and whether to pay damages to the families.

The decision, in all three cases, is no. The court formally rejected arguments that either the MMR vaccine or thimerosal caused the children's autism.

Although huge amounts of scientific evidence were heard in the case, the vaccine court's decision is a legal ruling and not scientific proof.
Full story
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 13th February 2009, 03:41 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,966
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 594 Times in 481 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

CNN are reporting:
Autism ruling fails to convince many vaccine-link believers
Quote:
A special court's Thursday ruling that no proven link exists between autism and certain early childhood vaccines seems to have done little to change the sometimes-passionate opinion fueling the debate.

Amanda Guyton, a mother of a 6-year-old boy with autism, was "incredibly happy" with the decision and said it reaffirmed her belief that her son's autism has nothing to do with vaccines.

"We're ready for them to get on real research like educational strategies and help for kids," she said. "An awful lot of money and effort and time were spent on vaccines when three or four studies said no, there isn't a link."

Meanwhile, John Best, the father of a 12-year-old boy with autism, said: "The whole thing stinks."

Guyton and Best were not involved in the cases, but were following the news because of their interest in autism.

Three families -- the Cedillos, the Hazlehursts and the Snyders -- had sought damage awards from the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program for their children who have autism, a disorder that the parents contend was triggered by the vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella combined with vaccines containing thimerosal, a mercury-based preservative.....
Full story
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 22nd September 2009, 02:19 PM
Craig Payne's Avatar
Craig Payne Craig Payne is offline
Moderator
Professor of Life, The Universe and Everything
 
About:
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 4,976
Join Date: Aug 2004
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 96
Thanked 865 Times in 596 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

Will this finally put an end to this nonsene:

From the BBC:
Autism rates back MMR jab safety
Quote:
Latest autism figures should dispel any fears about the MMR jab being linked to the condition, say experts.

The NHS Information Centre found one in every hundred adults living in England has autism, which is identical to the rate in children.

If the vaccine was to blame, autism rates among children should be higher because the MMR has only been available since the early 1990s, the centre says.

This is the first time the rate in adults has been evaluated.

Tim Straughan, chief executive of The NHS Information Centre, said: "This landmark report is the first major study into the prevalence of autism spectrum disorders among adults to be carried out anywhere in the world.

"While the sample size was small and any conclusions need to be tempered with caution, the report suggests that, despite popular perceptions, rates of autism are not increasing, with prevalence among adults in line with that among children.

"It also suggests that, among adults, rates of autism remain broadly constant across age groups.

"The findings do not support suggestions of a link between the MMR vaccine and the development of this condition."

A Department of Health spokesperson said: "There is no credible evidence to support the link between the MMR vaccine and autism.

"MMR vaccine has been used extensively and safely around the world for over 30 years and is the best way of protecting your child against measles, mumps and rubella."

Concern over the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine was sparked by a paper published in The Lancet in 1998 by Dr Andrew Wakefield.

'Safe' vaccine

This research has since been discredited.

But, until now, little was known about how autism affected people over the course of a lifetime.

The latest findings, based on nearly 7,500 adults, suggests that prevalence of autism spectrum disorder remains broadly level across all age bands.

While 1% of adults had an autism spectrum disorder, which includes autism and Asperger's syndrome, the rate for men was higher (1.8%) than for women (0.2%). This was in line with studies among child populations which show higher rates amongst boys.

And in line with recent report from the National Audit Office, the study also found many of these adults are failing to get the diagnosis and specialist help they need.

Mr Straughan said: "This does beg some questions about whether services, as currently configured, are meeting the needs of this group of people."

Mark Lever, chief executive of the National Autistic Society, said: "The NAS has long campaigned to raise awareness of the fact that services and support for adults with autism are woefully inadequate.

"This study gives us further evidence to demand that more vital support is put in place."

Care Services Minister Phil Hope said: "This study will feed into the first ever adult autism strategy, which we will publish at the end of this year.

"The strategy should kick-start radical improvements in services for all forms of autism."

People with autism spectrum disorder may suffer a range of problems, including difficulty interacting with other people and communicating their feelings.
__________________
Craig Payne
__________________________________________________ ___________________________________
Follow me on Twitter | Run Junkie | Latest Blog Post: Review of Lieberman et al’s (2010) paper in Nature on Barefoot Running
God put me on this earth to accomplish a certain number of things - right now I am so far behind, I will never die.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Craig Payne For This Useful Post:
Donnchadhjh (28th October 2009)
  #27  
Old 28th October 2009, 03:04 AM
gwilson gwilson is offline
Member
 
About:
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 16
Join Date: Mar 2005
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

I wrote a paper (not for publication) on Wakefields study a few years ago when I was studying Infection Control. His sample was not a cross section of the population, the children he studied were his own patients and were being treated for bowel problems. The sample size, if I remember correctly, was about 38. A study in Finland followed up ALL their children who had the MMR vaccine, and found no link between MMR and autism - a sample size of 3 MILLION! Wakefield's study was, for various reasons, one of the most flawed pieces of research I've ever read. As far as legal action goes, maybe parents of children with measles should be sueing Wakefield and The Lancet - remember that measles isn't just spots and a fever, it can and does cause blindness, brain damage, even death.

The biggest surprise is that this supposedly peer reviewed study was published at all - it's not easy getting published in The Lancet!
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 2nd February 2010, 01:41 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,966
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 594 Times in 481 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

Quote:
Originally Posted by gwilson View Post
The biggest surprise is that this supposedly peer reviewed study was published at all - it's not easy getting published in The Lancet!
They finally retracted it:
Medical journal retracts study linking autism to vaccine
Quote:
The medical journal The Lancet on Tuesday retracted a controversial 1998 paper that linked the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine to autism.

The study subsequently had been discredited, and last week, the lead author, Dr. Andrew Wakefield, was found to have acted unethically in conducting the research.
Full story and video
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 3rd February 2010, 01:16 AM
Robertisaacs's Avatar
Robertisaacs Robertisaacs is offline
Podiatry Arena Veteran
 
About:
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Kent
Posts: 4,290
Join Date: May 2006
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 454
Thanked 911 Times in 526 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

This story just goes from bad to worse.

Of course the study was unethical, he did lumbar punctures and colonoscopies on the poor sprogs just to prove his theory. But that is not the point.

When his paper, which had 12 case studies, was published do you know what happened? Next to nothing. The media did'nt care.

Only a year or two later when he republished a "review", and a cynic might suggest, when the media were having a slow week, did it take off!

There was the feeding frenzy of reporting in papers and on the news. But the real damage was not done by the study which the vast majority of the great unwashed will never read and would not understand even if they did. The real damage was done by the exciting headlines with time lapsed footage of a sprog kicking off in their living room behind a bullet list of "concerns". The damage was done by "concerned minor celebs" giving their comment. If carol vorderman nigella lawson and cherie blair are all worried then there must be something to it right? These are the people the public listen to!

And then of course there were all the ridiculously high power studies which proved that there was no link. Which the media almost without exception studiously ignored.

And now they have wrung every last drop out of scaring us that the MMR will turn little tommy into damien from the omen, they've found a new horse to ride, the demonic creepy doctor who experimented on children to fool us all and end the world! Mwoa ha ha ha etc.

Got the golden eggs, now its goose for dinner.

But make no mistake. Wakefield's study was one of a huge raft of dodgy research which comes out every year. It was the media who turned it from a minor crap paper in a journal unknown to the public into a scare which cost lives.

And what drives the media? We do.

So by all means lets burn Andrew wakefield at the stake. But lets not lose sight of what ACTUALLY happened. Because when we do (and most will) we guarentee it will happen again.

It just will. Because we're all stupid.



Robert
__________________
Robert Isaacs
Specialist in Biomechanical Therapies

small, yellow, leech-like, and probably the oddest thing in the universe

Semper in excretum sum sed alta variat

The opinions expressed are those of the author.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 10th February 2010, 08:11 AM
Griff's Avatar
Griff Griff is offline
Administrator
Spam Buster
 
About:
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: London / Dublin
Posts: 2,504
Join Date: Oct 2004
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 196
Thanked 698 Times in 425 Posts
Default Re: Anyone following the MMR vaccine and Autism debate?

Heres a recent article which found no link between MMR and autism. Seen this one in the news/papers yet? No didn't think so...

http://journals.lww.com/pidj/Documents/Lack_of_Association_Between_Measles_Mumps_Rubella. pdf

Ian
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Translate This Page


New To Site? Need Help?

Finding your way around:

Browse the forums.

Search the site.

Browse the tags.

Search the tags.


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:55 AM.