Home Forums Marketplace Table of Contents Events Member List Site Map Register Mark Forums Read



Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums, for communication between foot health professionals about podiatry and related topics.

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members (PM), upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, earn CPD points and access many other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisments in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.


Tags: , ,

Foot orthoses and multiple sclerosis

Reply
Submit Thread >  Submit to Digg Submit to Reddit Submit to Furl Submit to Del.icio.us Submit to Google Submit to Yahoo! This Submit to Technorati Submit to StumbleUpon Submit to Spurl Submit to Netscape  < Submit Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 25th April 2006, 12:10 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,980
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 595 Times in 481 Posts
Default Foot orthoses and multiple sclerosis

Podiatry Arena members do not see these ads
De-stabilizing and training effects of foot orthoses in multiple sclerosis.
Mult Scler. 2006 Apr;12(2):219-26
Quote:
This study evaluates the effects of dynamic foot orthoses (DFO) on walking and balance performance in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Sixteen ambulant subjects with MS and ten age-matched healthy control subjects were studied on initial receipt of foot orthoses and after four weeks of daily wear. Walking speed, MS Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12) and standing balance were assessed with and without orthoses at both these times. During standing, stance width and vision were varied, and performance was quantified using the velocity of the centre of pressure (COP), body sway velocity and the mean COP position relative to the shoe. People with MS walked slower (P <0.001) and showed increased sway when standing (P <0.001). At the first assessment, the foot orthoses caused an increase in sway and a medial and posterior shift of the COP position. At repeat measurement, the DFOs continued to increase sway compared to a shoe only condition. However, MS subjects reported an improvement in the MSWS-12 (P <0.05) and, compared to the initial session, showed decreased sway when eyes were closed both with and without DFOs. Dynamic foot orthoses may increase sway and change COP position by altering foot alignment and/or plantar afferent stimulation. Improvement in body sway over time may be an overall training effect of the DFOs, as MS subjects adapt to the initial de-stabilization
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 25th April 2006, 01:39 PM
DaVinci's Avatar
DaVinci DaVinci is offline
Podiatry Arena Veteran
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 633
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 97
Thanked 53 Times in 38 Posts
Default Multiple sclerosis

What do they mean by "dynamic foot orthoses"?

Last edited by DaVinci : 25th April 2006 at 11:28 PM. Reason: typo
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 25th April 2006, 01:41 PM
Craig Payne's Avatar
Craig Payne Craig Payne is offline
Moderator
Professor of Life, The Universe and Everything
 
About:
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 4,979
Join Date: Aug 2004
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 96
Thanked 866 Times in 597 Posts
Default Multiple sclerosis

I have not seen the article, but I assume they mean this:

Dynamic foot orthoses. Principles and application
DJ Pratt
Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association, Vol 90, Issue 1 24-29, 2000
Quote:
Previous research has identified areas under the foot where stimulation evokes specific tonic reflexes. The term "tonic" is used because these reflex movements occur slowly, as if tonus or tension were accumulating, in contrast to the abrupt phasic response of a tendon jerk. The concept of tonic reactions has now been incorporated into the design of dynamic foot orthoses to help provide improved orthotic treatment with a better functional outcome. This article describes the background of this technique, briefly describes the manufacture of the dynamic orthosis, and outlines some of its uses.
__________________
Craig Payne
__________________________________________________ ___________________________________
Follow me on Twitter | Run Junkie | Latest Blog Post: Review of Lieberman et al’s (2010) paper in Nature on Barefoot Running
God put me on this earth to accomplish a certain number of things - right now I am so far behind, I will never die.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 25th April 2006, 01:44 PM
Admin2's Avatar
Admin2 Admin2 is offline
Administrator
 
About:
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Cyberspace
Posts: 3,995
Join Date: May 2005
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 15
Thanked 140 Times in 124 Posts
Default Multiple sclerosis

Related thread:
Multiple Sclerosis, Chemotherapy and podiatric implications.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 26th April 2006, 02:17 PM
Hylton Menz Hylton Menz is offline
Senior Member
 
About:
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 191
Join Date: Oct 2004
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 2
Thanked 40 Times in 26 Posts
Default

Here's the orthoses they used:



They are based on the model described by Nancy Hylton:

Hylton NM. The use of dynamic AFOs and their impact on balance and upper body function. Neurol Rep 1989; 13: 15/18.

Hylton NM. Postural and functional impact of dynamic AFOs and FOs in a paediatric population. J Prosthet Orthot 1990; 2: 40/53.

Cheers,

Hylton (no relation to Nancy )
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 13th November 2007, 12:58 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,980
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 595 Times in 481 Posts
Default Re: Foot orthoses and multiple sclerosis

Functional effect of an ankle foot orthosis on gait in multiple sclerosis: a pilot study.
Sheffler LR, Hennessey MT, Knutson JS, Naples GG, Chae J:
Am J Phys Med Rehabil 2007;86:000-000.
Quote:
OBJECTIVE:: The objective was to determine whether an ankle foot orthosis improves gait velocity and tasks of functional ambulation in multiple sclerosis (MS).

DESIGN:: This cross-sectional study enrolled 15 participants with diagnosis of MS, dorsiflexion and eversion weakness, and more than 3 mos of using a physician-prescribed ankle foot orthosis (AFO). Subject ambulation was evaluated (1) without an AFO and (2) with an AFO. Outcome measures were the Timed 25-Foot (T25-FW) Walk portion of the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) and the five trials (Floor, Carpet, Up and Go, Obstacles, Stairs) of the Modified Emory Functional Ambulation Profile (mEFAP).

RESULTS:: The mean timed differences on the T25-FW and the five components of the mEFAP between the AFO vs. no device trials were not statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS:: In MS subjects with dorsiflexion and eversion weakness, no statistically significant improvement was found performing timed tasks of functional ambulation with an AFO.
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 25th July 2009, 03:45 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,980
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 595 Times in 481 Posts
Default Re: Foot orthoses and multiple sclerosis

Spatiotemporal and kinematic effect of peroneal nerve stimulation versus an ankle-foot orthosis in patients with multiple sclerosis: a case series.
Sheffler LR, Bailey SN, Chae J.
PM R. 2009 Jul;1(7):604-11.
Quote:
OBJECTIVE: To compare the effect of a surface peroneal nerve stimulator (PNS) versus an ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) on spatiotemporal and kinematic parameters of gait in patients with multiple sclerosis.

DESIGN: This was a case series design. PARTICIPANTS: Four subjects with multiple sclerosis and dorsiflexion weakness. INTERVENTION: Quantitative gait analysis with the use of (1) no device, (2) AFO, and (3) PNS as a single point-in-time assessment. OUTCOME MEASURES: Included walking speed, stride length, cadence, and double support time; kinematic parameters included peak pelvic obliquity during swing, peak contralateral hip abduction during stance, peak knee flexion and hip flexion during swing, ankle dorsiflexion at initial contact, and peak ankle internal rotation during swing.

RESULTS: One-way analysis of variance was used to compare intrasubject performance under the 3 device conditions. The PNS significantly increased ankle dorsiflexion angle at initial contact, as compared with both no device and the AFO, in 3 of the 4 subjects. However, other spatiotemporal and kinematic gait parameters were more variably affected by the device conditions.

CONCLUSIONS: With the exception of ankle dorsiflexion angle at initial contact, PNS and AFO have a variable effect on spatiotemporal and kinematic gait parameters in individual subjects with multiple sclerosis. Further studies are indicated to determine the clinical significance of intrasubject differences between device conditions
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 3rd November 2010, 03:55 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,980
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 595 Times in 481 Posts
Default Re: Foot orthoses and multiple sclerosis

The effect of textured insoles on gait patterns of people with multiple sclerosis.
Kelleher KJ, Spence WD, Solomonidis S, Apatsidis D.
Gait Posture. 2010 May;32(1):67-71. Epub 2010 Apr 18.
Quote:

BACKGROUND: Somatosensory deficit is a common feature of MS. One method serving to combat impaired plantar sensation may be to provide enhanced sensory feedback from the sole of the foot by changing the characteristics of a shoe sole or surface. This study aimed to inspect the effect of textured insoles on gait patterns in a group of MS patients.

METHODS: 14 patients with MS and 10 healthy control subjects were recruited for this study. Plantar sensation was evaluated using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments. Kinematic, kinetic and EMG gait data were collected for MS patients walking with flat shoes only and again with shoes and a textured insole in contact with the sole of patients' feet.

RESULTS: A reduction in plantar sensation was identified in the MS patient group compared to the control group. Wearing the textured insoles there was a significant increase in hip and knee sagittal plane excursion, maximum ankle dorsiflexion, knee flexion and in peak acceleration ground reaction force. Throughout the stance phase, EMG activity of shank muscles was typically found to increase whilst wearing the textured insoles.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Despite some positive changes in gait patterns when wearing textured insoles, an increased foot-shank angle in terminal stance suggests that patients did not propel their swing limb through increased contribution of ankle plantarflexor muscles, perhaps favouring more proximal muscle groups. Whilst the textured insoles may alter gait patterns in MS patients, their contribution to achieving a more regular gait pattern with sufficient propulsion from ankle plantarflexors remains uncertain.
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 1st November 2011, 11:54 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,980
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 595 Times in 481 Posts
Default Re: Foot orthoses and multiple sclerosis

The Effect of Textured Insoles on Gait in People with Multiple Sclerosis: An Exploratory Study.
Dixon J, Gamesby H, Robinson J, Hodgson D, Hatton AL, Warnett R, Rome K, Martin D.
Physiother Res Int. 2011 Oct 28.
Quote:
PURPOSE:
This study aimed to investigate whether textured insoles can improve gait in people with multiple sclerosis (MS).

RELEVANCE:
Previous studies have shown that footwear, including textured insoles, may improve postural stability in healthy young and older adults (Palluel et al., 2008; Hatton et al., 2009; Hatton et al., 2011), and there is some evidence to show that footwear interventions may be beneficial for people with MS (Ramdharry et al., 2006; Kelleher et al., 2010).

PARTICIPANTS:
Forty-six people with MS (34 women), mean age (SD) 49 years (7), who reported that they were able to walk 100 m with or without resting with the use of one stick or crutch, participated in the study.

METHODS:
Ethical approval was granted by the Local Research Ethics Committee. Participants were randomized to one of two textured insole groups: texture A (Algeos UK Ltd, Liverpool, UK), which was used in our previous studies (Hatton et al., 2009; Hatton et al., 2011), or texture B, a commercial insole (Crocs™, Den Haag, The Netherlands). Participants conducted baseline walking tests at their preferred speed along an instrumented walkway (GAITRite) in a laboratory setting, and temporal-spatial gait parameters were extracted. Participants then wore the insoles for two weeks and returned for repeat testing.

ANALYSIS:
Paired t-tests were used to evaluate changes between baseline and follow-up.

RESULTS:
Stride length increased between baseline and follow-up in both legs in group A (left p = 0.01, right p = 0.02) and group B (left p = 0.02, right p = 0.02). Velocity and cadence did not change significantly in either group.

DISCUSSION:
This finding that textured insoles can produce improvements in stride length requires further investigation. It is consistent with research on foot orthoses in MS showing an improvement in balance after four weeks of wear
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 27th September 2013, 03:57 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,980
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 595 Times in 481 Posts
Default Re: Foot orthoses and multiple sclerosis

Effect of textured insoles on balance and gait in people with multiple sclerosis: an exploratory trial
J. Dixon, A.L. Hatton, J. Robinson, H. Gamesby-Iyayi, D. Hodgson, K. Rome, R. Warnett, D.J. Martin
Physiotherapy; Available online 23 September 2013
Quote:
Objectives
To investigate the immediate effects of textured insoles on balance and gait in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), and to explore any effects after 2 weeks of wear.

Study design
Within-session repeated-measures design with an exploratory follow-up period.

Setting
Hospital gait laboratory.

Participants
Forty-six individuals with MS (34 females, 12 males), with a mean (SD) age of 49 (7) years, who could walk 100 m unassisted or using one stick/crutch.

Intervention
Participants were tested wearing three types of insoles in a random order: control (smooth), Texture 1 (Algeos) or Texture 2 (Crocs™). Participants were allocated at random to wear one type of textured insoles for 2 weeks, after which they were retested.

Main outcome measures
Standing balance (centre of pressure excursions and velocity) was measured with eyes open and eyes closed on a Kistler force platform. Spatio-temporal parameters of gait were measured using a GAITRite system.

Results
The textured insoles had no significant immediate effects on balance or gait, apart from an increase in anteroposterior sway range with eyes open for Texture 2 insoles [mean difference 4.5 (95% confidence interval 0.6 to 8.4) mm]. After 2 weeks, balance was not significantly different, but both types of textured insoles showed significant effects on spatio-temporal parameters of gait, with mean stride length increases of 3.5 cm (Texture 1) and 5.3 cm (Texture 2) when wearing the insoles.

Conclusions
After 2 weeks of wear, there were improvements in spatio-temporal parameters of gait. However, it is unclear whether this was a placebo effect or a learning effect.
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 7th May 2014, 02:08 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,980
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 595 Times in 481 Posts
Default Re: Foot orthoses and multiple sclerosis

Experiences of functional electrical stimulation (FES) and ankle foot orthoses (AFOs) for foot-drop in people with multiple sclerosis.
Bulley C, Mercer TH, Hooper JE, Cowan P, Scott S, van der Linden ML.
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2014 May 6.
Quote:
Purpose: A constructivist phenomenological study explored impacts of ankle foot orthoses (AFOs) or functional electrical stimulation (FES) on people with foot-drop from multiple sclerosis (MS). Method: Focus groups following topic guides were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis, with researcher reflexivity, participant verification and peer checking of analysis. Participants with sustained use of the devices (under 2 y) were invited from two quantitative studies that (a) investigated immediate FES effects (n = 12) and (b) compared habitual use of AFO (n = 7) or FES (n = 6). Two focus groups addressed AFO (n = 4) and FES (n = 6) experiences. Results: Similar numbers of positive and negative aspects were described for AFO and FES. Both reduced fatigue, improved gait, reduced trips and falls, increased participation, and increased confidence; greater balance/stability was reported for AFOs, and increased walking distance, fitness and physical activity for FES. Barriers to both included avoiding reliance on devices and implications for shoes and clothing; a non-normal gait pattern was reported for AFO, and difficulties of application and limitations in the design of FES. However, participants felt the positives outweighed the negatives. Conclusions: Participants felt benefits outweighed the drawbacks for AFO and FES; greater understanding of user preferences and satisfaction may increase likelihood of usage and efficacy. Implications for Rehabilitation Interventions to reduce the impacts of foot-drop in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) are important to optimise physical activity participation and participation in life; they include ankle foot orthoses (AFOs) and functional electrical stimulation (FES). Research is lacking regarding user satisfaction and perceived outcomes, therefore, two separate focus groups were conducted from a constructivist phenomenological perspective to explore the impacts of AFOs (n = 4) and FES (n = 6) on people with foot-drop from MS. Some similar positive aspects of AFO and FES use were described, including reduced fatigue, improved gait and fewer trips and falls, while common barriers included finding the device cumbersome, uncomfortable, and inconvenient, with some psychological barriers to their use. On balance, the impacts of the devices on improving activities and participation were more important for participants than practical barriers, highlighting the importance of combining understanding of individual experiences and preferences with clinical decision-making when prescribing a device to manage foot-drop.
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Translate This Page

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Medial tibial stress syndrome Admin Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses 118 10th June 2013 08:33 PM
Is forefoot varus posting an anachronism? Atlas Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses 96 24th June 2011 12:13 PM
Foot orthoses and asymptomatic pediatric flatfoot Craig Payne Pediatrics 45 2nd January 2009 01:16 PM
Subtalar joint neutral approach to mechanical foot therapy Admin Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses 20 5th September 2006 08:23 PM
Where Should the First Ray be When Casting for Orthoses? Admin Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses 22 27th July 2005 10:22 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

Finding your way around:

Browse the forums.

Search the site.

Browse the tags.

Search the tags.


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:58 PM.