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Research info on prevalence of pronated feet

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  #1  
Old 16th February 2006, 12:44 PM
Ian Linane Ian Linane is offline
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Default Research info on prevalence of pronated feet

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Has anyone any idea if studies have been done to determine what percentage of the uk population have gross over pronation at the STJ?

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Ian
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Old 16th February 2006, 03:28 PM
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Iain

What is gross over pronation ?

Do you mean extended periods of a proned foot during late propusion, or fixed pes valgus? If it is the lattewr you may get some data from studies relating to rheumatoid disease.

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Old 20th February 2006, 09:52 AM
Ian Linane Ian Linane is offline
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Hi Cameron

"Do you mean extended periods of a proned foot during late propusion"

Kind of. In particular the foot that is very marked in eversion through out the stance period. But no rheumatic.

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Old 20th February 2006, 10:12 AM
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Simon Spooner Simon Spooner is offline
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Don't really know of any studies of dynamic rearfoot motion that have looked directly at prevelance in populations. You could look at:

Staheli, L.T., Chew, D.E., Corbett, M.: The longitudinal arch. J Bone and Joint Surg. 1987, 69A: 426-428

Although this is not UK population.

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Simon
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Old 20th February 2006, 01:44 PM
Ian Linane Ian Linane is offline
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Thanks Simon, I will try to look it up.

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Old 20th February 2006, 03:51 PM
Hylton Menz Hylton Menz is offline
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You won't find any truly representative data on the prevalence of dynamic "overpronation at the STJ". No large-scale epidemiological studies have looked at this.

However, the Cheshire Foot Pain and Disability Survey (link) reported the following prevalence of self-reported flat feet:



...and the Feet First study of 784 people aged over 65 in the US (link) reported an overall prevalence of flat feet of 19%. Their definition of a flat foot was one in which "the examiner was unable to insert his/her fingers under the arch of the foot with the respondent in a standing position".

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Old 24th February 2006, 02:38 AM
Ian Linane Ian Linane is offline
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Thanks Hylton, very helpful.

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