Home Forums Marketplace Table of Contents Events Member List Site Map Register Mark Forums Read



Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums, for communication between foot health professionals about podiatry and related topics.

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members (PM), upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, earn CPD points and access many other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisments in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.


Tags:

Ballet

Reply
Submit Thread >  Submit to Digg Submit to Reddit Submit to Furl Submit to Del.icio.us Submit to Google Submit to Yahoo! This Submit to Technorati Submit to StumbleUpon Submit to Spurl Submit to Netscape  < Submit Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 9th April 2008, 10:13 PM
Adrian Misseri's Avatar
Adrian Misseri Adrian Misseri is offline
Podiatry Arena Veteran
 
About:
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Ballarat
Posts: 230
Join Date: Apr 2008
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 20
Thanked 32 Times in 32 Posts
Default Ballet

Podiatry Arena members do not see these ads
Question,

At what stage radiographically can a girl go 'en pointe' in ballet? I assumed it would be after closure of primary growth centers, but what about secondary growth centers? Common consensus in the ballet world seems to be about 12 years old, but I'm not sure what to advise an 11 year old girl who has just presented asking if her feet are ready? Any ideas? I've sent for x-rays to check the growth centers, awaiting results.

-Adrian
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 9th April 2008, 10:52 PM
kemplr kemplr is offline
Member
 
About:
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 15
Join Date: Apr 2008
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 2
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Default Re: Ballet

Hi Adrian,

How long has she been dancing for as well? It is not advisable to go en pointe if she is a beginner. It is advised that they have a few years ballet experience before pointe to strengthen leg muscles and develop good technique. The ballet teacher should also be able to give advice as to whether she is ready. I don't know radiographically.


Lauren
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10th April 2008, 12:03 AM
Admin2's Avatar
Admin2 Admin2 is offline
Administrator
 
About:
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Cyberspace
Posts: 3,813
Join Date: May 2005
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 15
Thanked 131 Times in 116 Posts
Default Re: Ballet

Related threads:
Dancers feet
Threads tagged with dancing
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10th April 2008, 02:08 AM
Simon Spooner's Avatar
Simon Spooner Simon Spooner is offline
Podiatry Arena Veteran
 
About:
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: "I'm sick of flags - whatever colour. There's only one flag - the white flag.": Paul Hewson
Posts: 7,713
Join Date: Aug 2005
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 437
Thanked 1,038 Times in 761 Posts
Default Re: Ballet

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrian Misseri View Post
Question,

At what stage radiographically can a girl go 'en pointe' in ballet? I assumed it would be after closure of primary growth centers, but what about secondary growth centers? Common consensus in the ballet world seems to be about 12 years old, but I'm not sure what to advise an 11 year old girl who has just presented asking if her feet are ready? Any ideas? I've sent for x-rays to check the growth centers, awaiting results.

-Adrian
Age aside, I think it depends on whether this girl is good enough and wishes to make a career from ballet. If not, why would you want to do this to yourself? Lets face it, it isn't great for your feet.
__________________
Who? What? When? Why? Yeah? And? So? What?

"My mission drive is to open up my eyes, 'cause the wicked lies and all the sh!te you say..." http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V4NW5S1UTPQ

"Science is the antidote to the poison of enthusiasm and superstition."
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10th April 2008, 05:42 AM
Bug's Avatar
Bug Bug is offline
Podiatry Arena Veteran
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 354
Join Date: Jan 2005
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 89
Thanked 90 Times in 67 Posts
Default Re: Ballet

Quote:
Age aside, I think it depends on whether this girl is good enough and wishes to make a career from ballet. If not, why would you want to do this to yourself? Lets face it, it isn't great for your feet.
Amen!!!!

Other than that I generally suss out the teacher. A good teacher will be the best guide.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10th April 2008, 11:07 AM
Ella Hurrell Ella Hurrell is offline
Senior Member
 
About:
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 180
Join Date: Dec 2007
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 30
Thanked 28 Times in 24 Posts
Default Re: Ballet

Having done a lot of ballet in my time, and with a number of patients since, it is generally the standard you have reached in ballet (ie. the grade/class/exams passed etc) that dictates when the teacher brings pointe work into the class. It tends to be that those acheiving a level where it is required for examns etc, are around 14-15 years old at least, assuming they have participated in ballet since younger childhood. I speak only about the UK - I have no idea the exam structure in other countries. Certainly in the UK it is fairly difficult to progress through the grades much earlier than this.

Ella

Last edited by Ella Hurrell : 10th April 2008 at 11:08 AM. Reason: typing error
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10th April 2008, 03:30 PM
Adrian Misseri's Avatar
Adrian Misseri Adrian Misseri is offline
Podiatry Arena Veteran
 
About:
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Ballarat
Posts: 230
Join Date: Apr 2008
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 20
Thanked 32 Times in 32 Posts
Default Re: Ballet

Thanks all for this!
The patient in question has been dancing for years and appears to want to make a career with it. I wil enquire with a dancing teacher and see what I can come up with.
Why someone would want to be a professional ballerina I'll never know.. pink tutu's just dont do it for me.
Thanks again!
-Adrian
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 4th May 2010, 08:28 AM
LER's Avatar
LER LER is offline
Senior Member
 
About:
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 54
Join Date: Jun 2009
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 5 Posts
Default Pointe shoes complicate biomechanics of ballet

Pointe shoes, which elongate a dancer's legs and accentuate the beauty of classical ballet technique, come with their own set of biomechanical principles- and their own set of risk factors for lower extremity injury. http://lowerextremityreview.com/arti...nics-of-ballet
__________________
Richard Dubin, Founder and Publisher
Lower Extremity Review
www.lowerextremityreview.com
FACEBOOK
TWITTER
rich@lowerextremityreview.com
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 21st May 2010, 02:55 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,278
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 13
Thanked 575 Times in 466 Posts
Default Re: Ballet

Magnetic resonance imaging of the ankle in female ballet dancers en pointe.
Russell JA, Shave RM, Yoshioka H, Kruse DW, Koutedakis Y, Wyon MA.
Acta Radiol. 2010 May 18. [Epub ahead of print]
Quote:
Background: Ballet dancers require extreme range of motion of the ankle, especially weight-bearing maximum plantar flexion (en pointe). In spite of a high prevalence of foot and ankle injuries in ballet dancers, the anatomy and pathoanatomy of this position have not been sufficiently studied in weight-bearing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a beneficial method for such study.

Purpose: To develop an MRI method of evaluating the ankles of female ballet dancers standing en pointe and to assess whether pathological findings from the MR images were associated with ankle pain reported by the subjects.

Material and Methods: Nine female ballet dancers (age, 21+/-2.9 years; dance experience, 16+/-4.1 years; en pointe dance experience, 7+/-4.9 years) completed an ankle pain visual analog scale questionnaire and underwent T1- and T2-weighted scans using a 0.25 T open MRI device. The ankle was scanned in three positions: supine with full plantar flexion, standing with the ankle in anatomical position, and standing en pointe.

Results: Obtaining MR images of the ballet dancers en pointe was successful in spite of limitations imposed by the difficulty of remaining motionless in the en pointe position during scanning. MRI signs of ankle pathology and anatomical variants were observed. Convergence of the posterior edge of the tibial plafond, posterior talus, and superior calcaneus was noted in 100% of cases. Widened anterior joint congruity and synovitis/joint effusion were present in 71% and 67%, respectively. Anterior tibial and/or talar spurs and Stieda's process were each seen in 44%. However, clinical signs did not always correlate with pain reported by the subjects.

Conclusion: This study successfully established an ankle imaging technique for ballet dancers en pointe that can be used in the future to assess the relationship between en pointe positioning and ankle pathoanatomy in ballet dancers.
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Translate This Page

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Achilles Tendon Pain in Ballet Dancers DanceMom Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses 5 12th October 2012 01:03 PM
New to research (ankle sprains in ballet) fmanning Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses 2 11th January 2008 02:14 PM
Foot type and Injury in Ballet Dancers EmmaJohnson Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses 4 11th April 2006 07:01 AM
Femoral torsion and ballet dancing NewsBot Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses 0 23rd March 2006 01:49 PM
Ballet School Students david meilak Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses 4 29th November 2004 12:49 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

Finding your way around:

Browse the forums.

Search the site.

Browse the tags.

Search the tags.


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:34 PM.