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Foot type and Injury in Ballet Dancers

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Old 6th November 2005, 04:26 AM
EmmaJohnson EmmaJohnson is offline
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Default Foot type and Injury in Ballet Dancers

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Hi there,

I wondered if anyone could help me. I am an undergraduate podiatrist (UK) and am currently researching for my dissertation. I am conducting primary research regarding foot type and incidence of foot and ankle injuries in ballet dancers. I hope to work with one of the ballet companies for my sample.

I wondered if any one with expertise in this area could offer any advise or recommend any research papers that would be of interest. I understand that more work has been conducted in the U.S regarding ballet dancers and would appreciate any help or guidance that could be given.

Kind Regards,

Emma
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Old 20th March 2006, 01:54 PM
montagu356 montagu356 is offline
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Default Ballet Info

Hi Emma

My thoughts are that probably the best thing for you to consider is toe length in relation to injuries. During my 16 years working with the Royal Ballet
I have observed that foot type is not easy as they all have incredibly strong musculature and they all have to rise through in neutral STJ position even if they have flat feet when standing. In my time I have only ever seen two principal dancers with 4 toes of equal length thes dancers worked consistently without injury year after year but for soft corns ID4/5.

hope that helps
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Old 23rd March 2006, 03:15 PM
efuller efuller is offline
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One difficulty you will have is in defining foot type. There are a couple of classification systems. Choose one that you can get repreatable measures.
Eric
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Old 10th April 2006, 01:05 PM
purpledeb purpledeb is offline
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Hi

Just read messages relating to ballet. I have a child coming in with problem relating to hallux toe/nail. Connected to going on pointe but would appreciate any tips on treatment at such a young age.
Deb
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Old 11th April 2006, 07:01 AM
montagu356 montagu356 is offline
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You do not say how old the patient is. I would hope she would be around 12 years of age. I would expect the nail plate to be cracked or sub ungual bleeding. Or possibly pain in the 1st MTP itself. Check nail length -too long is often a problem! If the nail plate is cracked or the nail is lifted so that the nail plate moves posteriorly it will set up an inflammation in the distal phalanx due to pointe work. If this is happening the only way to treat it is to remove the nail under L.A. Hope that is of help
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