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Assessment of Gait and Balance

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Old 9th November 2005, 10:05 AM
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Default Assessment of Gait and Balance

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Medscape have just relased a new CME on
Assessment of the Geriatric Patient: Gait and Balance
It has some OK video examples.

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Quote:
Assessment of the Geriatric Patient: Gait and Balance
Overview
Examination of the Lower Extremities
Abnormal Findings: Conditions to Consider
Gait Observations and Clinical Pearls
Gait Observations and Clinical Pearls (Continued)
Balance and Gait Assessment After a Fall
Office Evaluation of the Patient Who Has Experienced a Recent Fall
Conclusion
References
Quote:
Overview

Balance and gait assessment is difficult to teach, especially when using only text. There is more reality to an image than a word -- and this is one area where video images are worth thousands of words. Sequential logic works, but seems cumbersome. Pattern identification is difficult to communicate because of the nuances and subtleties of the observations. In addition, multiple neurologic and musculoskeletal conditions can occur in the elderly patient, often producing a more complex clinical picture. This Clinical Update will provide a systematic approach to the assessment of gait and balance, highlight abnormalities commonly seen among elderly patients, and provide video clips demonstrating some of these abnormalities.

Key Components of the Evaluation

In overview, there are 3 parts to the assessment of balance and gait in the elderly patient. First, the lower-extremity examination is focused on mechanical issues. Then, the complete (toe-to-head) neurologic examination looks for muscle weakness, impaired proprioception, cerebellar signs, basal ganglion dysfunction, and frontal lobe disease. Finally, the functional evaluation assesses the person's fall risk. Elements of the functional examination include the Tinetti variation of the "up and go" test with sitting, standing, walking, and turning; the functional reach test, and toe tapping
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Last edited by Admin : 9th November 2005 at 11:48 AM.
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