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Prevalence and burden of hyperhidrosis

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  #1  
Old 5th October 2012, 02:40 PM
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Default Prevalence and burden of hyperhidrosis

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Prevalence and burden of hyperhidrosis in the adult population
I Schäfer, MA Radtke, H Heigel, M Augustin
Dtsch med Wochenschr 2012; 137 - A292
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Aims: Hyperhidrosis is a common and sometimes burdensome hyperfunction of the sweat glands and can be a result of many underlying conditions. Patients affected with hyperhidrosis suffer from social problems, restrictions in daily activities as well as emotional and physical impairments.

Objectives: To evaluate the epidemiology and the disease burden of hyperhidrosis in a representative sample of German adults. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 52 German companies from several branches. Employees underwent skin screenings with full body exams and structured interviews.

Results: A total of 14,336 persons were investigated (36% women, mean age 42 yrs). Overall prevalence of hyperhidrosis was 16.3% (n=2,340), including n=869 (6.1%) with frequent or continuous sweating. Hyperhidrosis was in almost every age group more prevalent in men (18.2%) than in women (13.4%). 68% of the 2,340 study-participants suffering from hyperhidrosis reported generalised sweating whereas 28% of all hyperhidrosis was focal with the following distribution: hands 23%, feet 29%, axillary area 44%, others 34%.30% of the patients with focal hyperhidrosis stated that they felt bothered by sweating frequently or constantly.Most pronounced difference in dermatological comorbidity of study participants with vs. without hyperhidrosis hyperhidrosis was psoriasis (3% in comparison to 2% in persons without hyperhidrosis and tinea pedum (6% with vs. 4% without hyperhidrosis). As indicated by actual drug intake persons with metabolic comorbidity (diabetes, hypertension) also were at increased risk. Only 27% of persons with focal hyperhidrosis had consulted a physician, and only 28% used medication or self-medication.

Conclusions: Hyperhidrosis is a frequent condition predicted by personal and medical factors. In spite of the disease burden, only few persons affected consult a physician.v
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Old 5th October 2012, 03:24 PM
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Default Re: Prevalence and burden of hyperhidrosis

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Old 30th August 2013, 03:30 PM
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Default Re: Prevalence and burden of hyperhidrosis

Prevalence and Disease Burden of Hyperhidrosis in the Adult Population
Augustin M. Radtke M.A. Herberger K. Kornek T. Heigel H. Schaefer I.
Dermatology (DOI: 10.1159/000351292)
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Background: Although hyperhidrosis is a common and burdensome condition, little is known about the population-based prevalence. Objective: To evaluate the epidemiology, disease burden and medical care of hyperhidrosis in German adults.

Methods: Employees of fifty-two companies underwent skin screenings and interviews including hyperhidrosis questions.

Results: 14,336 individuals were investigated (36% women, mean age 42 years) of whom 2,340 (16.3%) reported hyperhidrosis, including 869 (6.1%) with frequent or continuous disturbing sweating. 28% showed focal hyperhidrosis, whilst 68% had a generalized condition. Predictors of hyperhidrosis were male gender and concomitant drug medication. Moreover, persons with psoriasis and with metabolic comorbidity were at increased risk. Only 27% of those with focal hyperhidrosis had consulted a physician, and only 28% used prescribed medication or self-medication.

Conclusion: Hyperhidrosis is a frequent skin condition predicted by medical and personal factors. In spite of the disease burden, few individuals utilize medical care. Affected individuals should be encouraged to refer to a dermatologist.
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Old 8th April 2014, 12:26 AM
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Default Re: Prevalence and burden of hyperhidrosis

Development, validation and clinical application of a patient-reported outcome measure in hyperhidrosis: The Hyperhidrosis Quality of Life Index (HidroQoL ©)
Kamudoni, Paul 2014.
PhD Thesis, Cardiff University.
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Consideration of broader outcomes of disease, especially those exclusively experienced and reported by the patient, such as HRQOL, is not only consistent with the ‘whole person’ view of health contained in the 1948 WHO definition, but is also a prerequisite to building health-care systems that are responsive to the needs of the patients. For chronic skin diseases, such as hyperhidrosis, these provide a useful indicator of how a patient feels and functions disease for both practical and methodological reasons. The aims of this study therefore were to investigate the impact of hyperhidrosis on patients’ HRQoL using a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods. In addition, a further aim was to develop and validate a disease-specific instrument for assessing HRQoL in hyperhidrosis. In pursuing the above aims, the feasibility of applying online social networking sites for outcomes research in dermatology was assessed. Patients were recruited through online social networking communities related to hyperhidrosis for all stages of the study. Interviews, focus groups and surveys were used for collecting qualitative data from patients (n = 71) to understand quality of life issues of patients, and to provide the content of the new instrument. Dermatologists (n= 5) and patients (n=7) took part in the content validation of the HidroQoL©. Item reduction and the development of the scale’s structure was carried out through several field-testing studies (n: USA, 559; UK, 115), using the item response theory (IRT) Rasch model and factor analyses. Further psychometric testing was performed in a separate study (n = 241). Distribution-based methods were applied in establishing minimum clinically important difference (MCID). A thematic analysis of the qualitative data collected produced 29 quality of life themes and 102 sub-themes, forming the content for the initial 49-item HidroQoL©. The two expert panels judged the instrument as content valid, with a few suggestions. The Rasch analysis modelling led to the collapsing of response categories (from five to three) and the reduction in number of items (from 49 to 18), to ensure a perfect model fit. Factor analyses supported both a single- and a two-factor structure. In subsequent construct validation study the HidroQoL correlated with the DLQI (rs = 0.572, p < 0.01) and the Skindex-17 (rs = 0.551, p < 0.01). Reliability was high (Cronbach alpha = 0.9; test-retest ICC = 0.93). The scores were sensitive to change in patients’ disease severity (standard response mean = 0.8, 95% C.I: 0.34-1.27). The scale banding proposed for the HidroQoL score is as follows: 0 – 1, no effect at all; 2 – 11, small effect; 12 – 22, moderate effect; 23 – 32, large effect; 33 – 36, very large effect. The MCID values were 1.94 – 3.07, for generalised v hyperhidrosis, 2.16 – 4.36, for axillary hyperhidrosis, 2.15 – 3.39, for palmo-plantar hyperhidrosis. An MCID of three is currently being proposed for all types of hyperhidrosis. This study has provided the initial evidence supporting the appropriateness of the content of the HidroQoL and validity of inferences from its scores for assessing HRQoL in hyperhidrosis. In addition, the availability of MCID estimates for the HidroQoL will facilitate its clinical interpretation in both research and routine clinical practice. This study has also demonstrated how CTT and IRT can be integrated in the development and validation of a new generation of HRQoL instruments, using social network for patient recruitment.
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Old 27th December 2014, 12:44 AM
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Default Re: Prevalence and burden of hyperhidrosis

Hyperhidrosis and social anxiety disorder--the same old thing under a different cloak?
Nahaloni E, Iancu I.
Harefuah. 2014 Oct;153(10):595-9, 624
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Hyperhidrosis is a reason for treatment by many specialists in medicine, such as dermatologists, family medicine doctors, surgeons and also psychiatrists. Hyperhidrosis causes considerable distress and disability. Despite the fact that the condition has been known for thousands of years, it is yet unclear whether excessive sweating derives from emotional" activation of the central nervous system, whether the emotional symptoms evolve due to local dysfunction of the sweat glands, or a combination of the two problems. In this article, we will present two conditions: hyperhidrosis and Social Anxiety Disorder, a mental condition with anxiety and avoidanrce in social settings that is frequently accompanied by sweating. We will discuss the similarities and differences between these disorders and the various treatments available for these conditions. Research shows that social anxiety does not explain hyperhidrosis, but that excessive sweating reduces the threshold for social anxiety. Among people with hyperhidrosis, the functional disability and the emotional problems are mediated by the social anxiety. We propose treating the symptoms of hyperhidrosis and social anxiety disorder in combination in order to achieve maximal improvement in these patients
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Old 24th January 2015, 07:52 PM
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Default Re: Prevalence and burden of hyperhidrosis

Distinguishing hyperhidrosis and normal physiological sweat production: new data and review of hyperhidrosis data for 1980–2013
Linnea Thorlacius MD, Mette Gyldenløve MD, Claus Zachariae MD, DMSc andBerit C. Carlsen MD, PhD
International Journal of Dermatology; Early View
Quote:
Hyperhidrosis is a condition in which the production of sweat is abnormally increased. No objective criteria for the diagnosis of hyperhidrosis exist, mainly because reference intervals for normal physiological sweat production at rest are unknown.

Objective
The main objective of this study was to establish reference intervals for normal physiological axillary and palmar sweat production.

Methods
Gravimetric testing was performed in 75 healthy control subjects. Subsequently, these results were compared with findings in a cohort of patients with hyperhidrosis and with the results derived from a review of data on hyperhidrosis published between 1980 and 2013.

Results
Approximately 90% of the controls had axillary and palmar sweat production rates of below 100 mg/5 min. In all except one of the axillary and palmar hyperhidrosis studies reviewed, average sweat production exceeded 100 mg/5 min.

Conclusions
A sweat production rate of 100 mg/5 min as measured by gravimetric testing may be a reasonable cut-off value for distinguishing axillary and palmar hyperhidrosis from normal physiological sweat production.
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Old 2nd January 2016, 04:16 AM
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Default Re: Prevalence and burden of hyperhidrosis

Idiopathic hyperhidrosis: Is response to parasympathetic function test altered?
G S Latha, Nagaraja Puranik.
Natl J Physiol Pharm Pharmacol. 2016; 6(1): 85-88doi: 10.5455/njppp.2015.5.1209201586
Quote:
Background: Idiopathic hyperhidrosis is characterized by excessive sweating, especially of palms of the hands and soles of the feet. It is said to be owing to sympathetic overactivity. However, autonomic nervous system as a whole could be dysfunctional in this condition, rather than isolated sympathetic dysfunction.

Aims and Objective: We have undertaken this study to test and compare the autonomic function status in these patients with age- and sex-matched healthy individuals.

Materials and Methods: Twenty, normal subjects with no known autonomic dysfunction as controls and 20, known idiopathic hyperhidrosis patients as subjects were taken for this study. Autonomic function tests were performed in both these groups and the results were compared.

Result: Sympathetic function tests, which were performed, were within the normal range whereas parasympathetic tests were normal except for response to deep breathing test, which showed a significant increase (P < 0.01) in the hyperhidrosis patients, compared with the controls.

Conclusion: Response to deep breathing, a parasympathetic test, was significantly increased in the patients with hyperhidrosis compared with controls in this study; we will conclude this study with the findings that the idiopathic hyperhidrosis seems to be a complex dysfunction of autonomic nervous system, which involves autonomic pathways other than those related to excess sweating.
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