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Laser treatment for nail fungus

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  #1  
Old 4th January 2009, 03:23 AM
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Default Laser treatment for nail fungus

Podiatry Arena members do not see these ads
netizens

A Good New Year to one and all.

"Apparently the most significant new treatment in podiatry in the last 40 years."

http://www.contracostatimes.com/california/ci_11365207

What was the last one?

What say you?

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  #2  
Old 25th March 2009, 01:25 AM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Quote:
Originally Posted by toeslayer View Post
"Apparently the most significant new treatment in podiatry in the last 40 years."
Not according to the New York Times:

False Start on a Laser Remedy for Fungus
Quote:
Laser eye surgery has enabled millions of people to throw away their eyeglasses. Now several medical technology companies are hoping that lasers aimed at the feet will allow millions to take their socks off, even in public.

The target is toenail fungus — an infection in an estimated 10 percent of American adults, or 23 million people — that causes toenails to become thick, yellow and fetid.

If these lasers, which recently completed small clinical trials, work, they will represent a new way to treat nail infection by selectively irradiating fungi while leaving the nail and surrounding tissue intact.

Right now, there is no sure cure. The fungi are so hardy that popular antifungal pills, which carry a small risk of liver damage, are completely successful less than half of the time. And a prescription lacquer, painted on the toenails daily for 48 weeks, has a complete cure rate of less than 10 percent.

Pharmaceutical giants like Schering-Plough and Novartis are developing new lacquers, pills and ointments to battle the fungi. But some podiatrists and patients are pinning their hopes on the experimental laser treatments.

Nomir Medical Technologies in Waltham, Mass., is developing a laser called Noveon for diseases like antibiotic-resistant staph infections as well as nail afflictions.

Noveon is a type of laser already commonly used by doctors for treatments like cataract surgery, dental work and even hair removal. Noveon beams two different wavelengths of near-infrared light at toenails to selectively take aim at and kill fungi.

After four treatments with Noveon, about half of the 39 toenails tested no longer had active nail infections, according to the results of a clinical trial that the company presented this month at a national dermatology meeting. Six months after the initial treatment, about 76 percent of the volunteers had clear nail growth, the study reported.

“We will be able to reach people who have heretofore stayed away from treatment because of the toxicity or the costs or other reasons,” said Richard F. Burtt, Nomir’s chief executive.

Mr. Burtt said the company was preparing to submit the data to the Food and Drug Administration, hoping to receive clearance to market Noveon by this fall. The agency has already cleared Noveon for use on the skin and in nasal passages. But the company is not taking orders for or distributing the laser for nails until it receives specific permission to do so, Mr. Burtt said.

Another company developing a laser, PathoLase, is so eager to get a piece of the billion-dollar-plus market for antifungal nail treatments that it has not waited for federal permission to begin marketing its device, the PinPointe Footlaser, for use on toenail fungus. Nearly 70 podiatrists in 21 states already offer PinPointe, according to PathoLase. The treatment, which is not covered by health insurance, costs $1,000 or more.

The F.D.A. requires manufacturers to wait for federal clearance before marketing a medical device for specific uses. But PathoLase appears to have jumped the gun in the war on spores.

Last week, a news broadcast by a Fox affiliate in Manhattan featured PinPointe as the latest thing for nail disorders. Dr. Stuart J. Mogul, a podiatrist in Manhattan who demonstrated the laser during the broadcast, said he had recently treated four patients with PinPointe at a cost of $1,200 each. He said it was too soon to tell whether the treatment had worked.

“I explain to patients that the only risk is financial,” Dr. Mogul said in an interview last week.

He added that representatives of PathoLase had told him that the F.D.A. had approved the laser as being safe.

Up until Tuesday, PinPointe’s Web site promoted the toenail laser as “F.D.A. cleared” and included an endorsement from a podiatrist in California saying he had used the device for six months on 225 patients.

Because the F.D.A. cleared the device in 2001 for use in dentistry, doctors are free to use it for other purposes, John Strisower, the chief executive of PathoLase, said in an interview on Monday.

Technically, the F.D.A. does not regulate the practice of medicine, so doctors are indeed able to use approved drugs and devices for unapproved purposes when they deem it appropriate.

But Timothy A. Ulatowski, director of compliance at the Center for Devices and Radiological Health at the F.D.A., said companies were legally allowed to market a medical device only for the specific use for which it had been granted clearance. Selling or promoting a device for unapproved indications is illegal, he said. He added that the company might face action from the agency, ranging from a warning letter to fines, injunctions or product seizures.....
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  #3  
Old 25th March 2009, 01:27 AM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Related threads:
Optical energy treatment for onychomycosis
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  #4  
Old 26th March 2009, 02:26 PM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

new? I've been using laser Tx on fungal nails since the early 1980's. Good results, largely dependent on the patients compliance with applying the med BID. ciclopirox olamine solution seems to be a bit more effective than previous meds.

Certainly safer than oral meds.

Cheers

Frederick
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  #5  
Old 27th March 2009, 06:53 AM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Usually fungal nails are due to a weakness in the toenail caused by Trauma. the most common trauma is tight shoes. That's why most women develop fungal or damaged nails on their 1st and especially 5th toenails. This damage is permanent and no medication or laser can reverse matrix cells that have been killed by ischemia caused by tight shoes. The fungus can be cured with lamasil but the damaged nails will still show this damage be more porous and prone to fungus. Seldom does fungus spread from a damaged nail to an adjacent normal nail so the fear of fungus on locker room floors is silly. Fungus is everywhere in our environment. In nail salons frequently the "technicians" (using sterile equipment) push back cuticles opening them up allowing a perfect bed for yeast infections. Again this is not due to dirty equipment but opening up the cuticle. The cuticle is a seal between the skin and the nail and should not be opened.

Lets all get real when it comes to fungus how many patients have you seen with one or two fungal nails and never had seen it spread for ten or twenty years to adjacent nails. You know it is not contagious. You know the true reason for nail fungus.
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  #6  
Old 29th March 2009, 11:16 AM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Hi facfsfapwca,

Quote:
Usually fungal nails are due to a weakness in the toenail caused by Trauma. the most common trauma is tight shoes. That's why most women develop fungal or damaged nails on their 1st and especially 5th toenails.
Yep, agree with that. Trauma (tight fitting shoes) plus occlusive footwear is a safe harbour for dermatopyhtes, which is why we witness a rise in incidence during winter months in particular.

Quote:
This damage is permanent and no medication or laser can reverse matrix cells that have been killed by ischemia caused by tight shoes.
This is a point that many practitioners fail to appreciate; slow tissue growth and poor blood flow mean that onychomycosis is difficult to target. However, the damage is only permanent if the entire matrix has been damaged as healthy nail regrowth is possible if external conditions, which lead to initial infection, are suitably corrected, along with appropriate fungicidal medication.

Quote:
Seldom does fungus spread from a damaged nail to an adjacent normal nail so the fear of fungus on locker room floors is silly. Fungus is everywhere in our environment.
Whilst transferral of infection from nail to nail is unlikely, we cannot ignore the important interplay between skin and nail infection. It is well documented that onychomycosis commonly leads to tinea pedis and vice versa (particularly where the nail plate has been subject to trauma). Therefore, the skin can act as a reservoir for pathogenic fungi, so I wouldn`t necessarily declare locker room infection as silly. As facfsfapwca (Please give us an easier pseudonym!?) stated “fungus IS everywhere in our environment” and infection spreading from one site of the body to another is possible, even probable amongst those with a history of relapses and reinfections, that is patients with defective cell mediated immunity that prevents them from mounting an effective host response are predisposed to chronic infection, spread of infection and recurrence.

Quote:
In nail salons frequently the "technicians" (using sterile equipment) push back cuticles opening them up allowing a perfect bed for yeast infections. Again this is not due to dirty equipment but opening up the cuticle. The cuticle is a seal between the skin and the nail and should not be opened.
Absolutely, the eponychium is often compromised when the cuticle is pushed back in pedicures, leaving a portal of entry for all kinds of opportunistic visitors!

Quote:
Lets all get real when it comes to fungus how many patients have you seen with one or two fungal nails and never had seen it spread for ten or twenty years to adjacent nails. You know it is not contagious. You know the true reason for nail fungus.
I agree that fungal infection is not contagious to a proportion of the population (ie those who do posses cell mediated immunity) and, whilst this is straying from the theme of this particular thread, I would greatly appreciate your expansion on what you consider to be the true reason for onychomycosis?

Cheers,
Bel
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  #7  
Old 29th March 2009, 01:53 PM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Compromised individuals HIV even Downs syndrome are predisposed to fungal infections.
nails that have permanently weakened can be improved with lamasil PO but the weakness is still there and will recur in a year or two. Clean or dirty locker rooms won't change this except for HIV or other immunde compromised..
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Old 30th March 2009, 07:12 AM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Belinda,

I am quoting you and correcting you. "the damage is only permanent if the entire matrix has been damaged as healthy nail regrowth is possible if external conditions, which lead to initial infection"

Nail matrix is a group of cells and when some of them have been killed by ischemia from a tight shoe. They are i repeat "killed". You will always have a line or porous area where the matrix has been "killed". "healthy regrowth" is NOT possible. The nail may regrow free of fungus if treated with PO Lamasil but will always by missing those dead cells and recurrence is always likely depending on the extent of the damage. Even Lamasil has a diagram of a "cured Nail" they show lines and discoloration it is not normal. Why do people say a nail will regrow normally if cells have been killed?
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Old 30th March 2009, 07:19 AM
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Wink Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Why do people give the attribute of curing nail fungus with products not indicated for nails? If a topical worked on nail fungus it would be to their advantage to state so in their literature and indications. The only topical so far is Penlac and its cure rate is low.

Putting plane baby oil (not even tea tree oil) on a nail and debriding it will make it look better. Stating that Baby oil is a cure would seem foolish. So is stating that Teatree oil is just as foolish.

What is the mechanism for Laser's to cure fungus. Does it bring to life the dead matrix cells? Ha Ha
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Old 30th March 2009, 11:05 AM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Hi facfsfapwca,

Absolutely agree that pts with systemic conditions such as Downs, Parkinsons, DM, etc and those with compromised immunity are predisposed to OM (hence my reference to `patients with defective cell mediated immunity….`) and that recurrence is likely where the nail has been weakened by disturbed matrix function. Yes, the weakness will always be there, but as these individuals are susceptible to spread of infection, I would advise those with suppressed immunity to take reasonable precautions in communal bathing facilities, etc where evidence has shown that tinea infection is possible and compromises the integrity of the skin and may result in secondary bacterial infections.

I`m not disagreeing with you here, of course any cells that suffer ischaemia/death will not synthesize trichocytes and as the nail bed cornifies the nail grooves lose their normal contour/become porous. I`m sorry I did not make myself clear, I merely meant that any matrix cells that had NOT been damaged are capable of producing a healthier (that is healthier than a fungal infected) nail if external conditions, such as footwear are addressed along with medication, etc, etc.

Anyway, anyway, anyway we`ve gone off topic here and like you, I would be interested to know;

Quote:
What is the mechanism for Laser's to cure fungus. Does it bring to life the dead matrix cells? Ha Ha
Does it have resurrective (not sure that`s a word?) qualities? I`m sure if it is at best as effective as Penlac or Amorolfine, the evidence woul dhave been published. Does anyone know of any up to date research on laser tx for OM?
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Old 30th March 2009, 12:48 PM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Laser nor anything else can bring dead cells to life. Before i would try a laser I would like a detailed explanation of why it should work and double blind studies (the surgeon doesn't know whether the laser is on or not. I can tear off a fungal nail clean the nail bed there will be no fungus and the new nail will eventually be the same if not worse than the old one. Why would burning the nail change the fact that matrix cells are missing?
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Old 30th March 2009, 12:59 PM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Quote:
Does it have resurrective (not sure that`s a word?) qualities?
Quote:
Laser nor anything else can bring dead cells to life
Unfortunately wit is often lost in forum speak, I was trying to be ironic

I`m in agreement, once the matrix is damaged i fail to see how laser tx will acclomplish anything superior to what is currently advocated in the Cochrane.
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Old 30th March 2009, 01:01 PM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

"Cochrane" what does this refer to?
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Old 30th March 2009, 01:25 PM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Systematic reviews of evidence. Taken from the website;

"The Cochrane Library is a collection of databases that contain high-quality, independent evidence to inform healthcare decision-making. Cochrane reviews represent the highest level of evidence on which to base clinical treatment decisions."

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/c...tCochrane.html
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Old 30th March 2009, 01:56 PM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

I checked on line and searched Cochrane library using Onychomycosis and toenail found no reference to either. It would be great to find evidence based medicine on this topic.
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Old 18th April 2009, 12:31 PM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Here are some clips on this:







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Old 10th July 2009, 09:09 PM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

This clinical trial has just been registered:
PinPointe FootLaser for the Treatment of Onychomycosis
Quote:
To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the PathoLase FootLaser treatment of infected toenails.
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Old 22nd July 2009, 03:00 PM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Press Release:
PinPointe™ FootLaser™ Submits Its Breakthrough Laser Treatment For Toenail Fungus To Health Canada For Approval
22 Jul 2009
Quote:
PinPointe FootLaser announced it has submitted its innovative new laser treatment for toenail fungus (Onychomycosis) to Health Canada for approval. As the Federal department responsible for helping Canadians maintain and improve their health, Health Canada reviews medical devices to assess their safety, effectiveness and quality before being authorized for sale in Canada. PinPointe FootLaser has been awarded the CE Mark certifying it has met European Union consumer health and safety standards, has been cleared for use in the treatment of toenail fungus in the EU, and can be offered by healthcare providers throughout Europe. Additionally, the treatment is FDA cleared for applications in dermatology, plastic surgery, and podiatry in the United States.

John Strisower, CEO of PathoLase, noted that he is confident the device will be made available to licensed Canadian medical practitioners after the Health Canada review process is completed. Stated Strisower: "Onychomycosis afflicts approximately 900 million people around the world, including millions in Canada. We're very much looking forward to making PinPointe FootLaser available to Canadian practitioners as well, offering them an excellent opportunity for providing a unique and valuable service to their patients."

Safe Quick Treatment - No Drugs, Pain or Anesthesia

Introduced in 2008, PinPointe FootLaser uses a patented laser technology to target the pathogens that cause toenail fungus. With PinPointe FootLaser, patients are treated safely and quickly with no drugs, no anesthesia and no pain. PinPointe's laser light passes through the toenail without causing damage to the nail or surrounding skin. Following the procedure, the new nail will grow in healthy and clear. Unlike medication-driven treatments for toenail fungus, PinPointe FootLaser presents minimal risk of side effects. Competing medication procedures can result in a wide variety of side effects, including liver toxicity.

New Clinical Trial Currently Underway

Following an early study conducted among a small group of patients (Harris, McDowell and Strisower, Laser Treatment for Toenail Fungus, Proc. SPIE 7161A, 2009), which indicated a potential efficacy rate as high as 87%, the treatment is currently undergoing a major multi-site clinical trial entitled "Multi-Center Trial: Evaluation of PinPointe FootLaser Treatment for Infected Toenails (Onychomycosis)". The study, which has been granted approval by Health Canada, is being conducted at the dermatology clinic and research facility of Aditya K. Gupta, M.D., Ph.D., M.A. (Cantab), DABD, FAAD, FRCPC in London, Ontario, as well as at three additional sites in the U.S.
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Old 22nd July 2009, 04:11 PM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewsBot View Post
Press Release: "Following the procedure, the new nail will grow in healthy and clear."
We'll see about that claim and how true it is and for long it lasts, if it ever occurs in many patients. My advice.....?......don't hold your breath.
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Old 22nd July 2009, 06:59 PM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewsBot View Post
This clinical trial has just been registered:
PinPointe FootLaser for the Treatment of Onychomycosis
They register a clinical trial to test it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewsBot View Post
Press Release:
PinPointe™ FootLaser™ Submits Its Breakthrough Laser Treatment For Toenail Fungus To Health Canada For Approval
22 Jul 2009
Then put out a press release claiming how good it is.

...don't figure!

How often have we seen this pattern? (eg ESWT; MIS; etc)
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Old 3rd August 2009, 02:12 AM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Just picked up a news story from Count on News2
Quote:
The pinpoint laser—cleared by the FDA in 2008 to treat toenail fungus.
Quote:
“The success rate is proven to be 88 per cent, again there is a chance of recurrence if you don’t follow hygiene,“ Dr. Weinstein said.
According to the NY Times, the FDA have not cleared the PinPointe Laser for toenail fungus and according to PinPointe's own press release above, the proven succes rate:
Quote:
Following an early study conducted among a small group of patients (Harris, McDowell and Strisower, Laser Treatment for Toenail Fungus, Proc. SPIE 7161A, 2009), which indicated a potential efficacy rate as high as 87%, the treatment is currently undergoing a major multi-site clinical trial
...don't figure.
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Old 3rd August 2009, 09:10 PM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Here is another new 7 min clip touting the method:

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Old 5th August 2009, 02:10 AM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

What I can't figure out, is that this new laser machine is "new". The claims are that it takes up to a year before the nail fully grows out before the effect is seen after the one treatment that is claimed that is needed. If that is the case, then none of the people above have been using it for a year or more .... if that is the case where are all the testimonials for it coming from? How do they actually know it works that well? ... don't figure? Should this be in the snake oil category?
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Old 11th August 2009, 01:41 PM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Press Release:
Breakthrough Pinpointe™ Footlaser™ Treatment For Toenail Fungus Now Available In United Kingdom

Quote:
PinPointe™ FootLaser™ has just announced that it has certified six podiatrists in the United Kingdom to administer its revolutionary new laser treatment for toenail fungus.....With PinPointe FootLaser, patients are treated quickly and effectively with no oral or systemic drugs and no anesthesia. PinPointe's laser light passes through the toenail and surrounding skin without causing damage to either structure. The procedure allows the new nail to grow in healthy and clear. Unlike competing medication-driven treatments for toenail fungus, PinPointe FootLaser presents minimal risk of side effects. PinPointe FootLaser's first clinical study demonstrated better than 87% of the patients studied had significant clear nail growth after just one in-office treatment
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Old 25th August 2009, 04:15 PM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

PodiatryToday are running an online Poll on this:

In your opinion, can laser care be a viable option for treating onychomycosis?

As of today, its:
Yes 40%
No 60%

Here are some of the comments posted:
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I have not seen any data supporting the laser therapy treatment for onychomycosis. Until then, I will remain skeptical, especially when patients will be spending there hard earned money.
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I can't beleive that in this day and age of evidence based practice that so many are touting this threatment before the main clinical studies are in.
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Laser is not indicated for either onychomycosis that has not spread proximal to the epiniychium or infection that has spread and is in the root/matrix area. For infection that is distal to the epinychium, complete debridement of all infected nail and bed followed by prescribing topicals is effective. Although laser can be used for debridement instead of a nail burr, the cost has to be much higher, just to pay for the equipment, than using a Dremel drill and burr. Therefore, it is not indicated for distal mycotic infections. And, if the infection extends proximal to the epinychium, the laser cannot reach it, so it not indicated for this either. In other words, there is no rational indication for laser in treating mbBG3onychomycosis.
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Like Lamisil I think we can expect a nearly100% eventual reoccurance with Laser treatment.
This is supported by the epidemiology.
The cost is twice what Lamisil used to be and the effectiveness is about the same. Lamisil is generic now and very cheap.
Liver problems have been overblown.
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probably be a short lived treatment option like the silicone injection etc.
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I believe it is a marketing gimic.
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it is being promoted by dpm's as having a 85% cure rate with absolutely no studies or scientific evidence. it is another example of the cart before the horse in podiatry. it is false advertising and deceitful to the public. if it is shown to be successful in the future, every dpm would have one and not a select few.
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I feel the laser will be ineffective proportionately with the increased deformity of the nail plate.
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Old 9th September 2009, 04:05 AM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Has anyone found out what type of laser they are using. I know it is a red light laser but the 1 -20 watt laser I have can ignite paper at a very low setting and burn 5mm deep into wart tissue.

What are the long term effects of burning the skin through the nail i.e scarring, blood supply cautery at the end capillaries - could lead to greater problems?????

Don Scott
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Old 9th September 2009, 08:10 AM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

I HAVE NOT ACTUALLY EVER HEARD A DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF HOW THIS MODALITY WORKS AND THE RATIONALE FOR ITS USE.
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Old 10th September 2009, 09:11 AM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

I thought it about time that I presented myself as one of the practitioners, in this country, operating the PinPointe FootLaser.

I have read through the posts a couple of times and find it a little odd or disappointing that so many people would want to remain anonymous. I have the courage of my own conviction to be happy to be named; and it is surprising what you can dig up on the medical effects of laser if you try. Even contacting the company directly will get you a professional and warm reception.

Currently @ 198 + Doctors of Podiatry in America are using this device. A bold move in itself; considering the litigious nature of the country.
Researching the principal characters involved would be a revelation to many because of their backgrounds in medical research.
Professor Harris would no doubt be happy to give anyone the benefit of his years in medical research and his involved work with the use of lasers in Otolaryngology; he has a considerable reputation and has much peer review to his credit.

There is a board of advisors and scientists involved and a serious amount of financial investment, even interest from the American Cystic Fibrosis organisation. I presume that people do not know of any of this, but a simple rudimentary search of the PathoLase site would reveal traces for contact and further research and would even reveal contact details for many of them. John Strisower the man behind this has deeply personal reasons to develop a range of laser technologies to treat many medical diseases, and he has passion and vision. He has made fortunes off his other business interests and committed many of his own millions to the project.
I consider John to be a serious intellect with a wide vision capable of gathering around him the expertise to make things happen. He certainly seems to demonstrate a level of greater intellect and humility than I see in evidence in close quarter. His CV is of seriously substantial proportions and was an invited participant of the Milken Institute Global Conference in 2009. I could go on about each and everyone involved but I think it better to invite those who have so far demonstrated a a little laziness in their own research to dig a bit more. A short walk for some might be all that is needed. There is even one operating on Scripps Drive.

So what is it? It is a serious technological variety of medical laser set to operate at 4 watts using a single beam width, fired in measured pulses to target the sensitivity range of the pathogens involved in mycotic nail infections, using a specified treatment protocol.
More in depth technical details are proprietary and therefore kept by the company. One certainly should not consider using just any old laser in the belief that it is going to do the same thing.
Elegant debridement is a useful skill to demonstrate prior to delivery. It is designed to penetrate both nail and soft tissue without damage to host tissue but harmful to the range of pathogens involved; Viral, bacterial, mould and fungal.
The treatment is mainly without discomfort and has no systemic side effects reported at all.
Perhaps anyone interested could call Dr. Michael Uro in Sacramento he has performed perhaps close to 800 procedures to date, and could be considered the pre-eminent authority on the subject.
Up to now, when presented with a patient asking for treatment our profession in the UK has only been able to administer remedial palliative care and suggested a range of medications either close to useless or capable of serious side effects. The most serious of all being fatal.
Patients now have a viable physical treatment to consider, but will be unable to make an informed choice if the podiatrist they have sought to consult omits to mention it.
The cost seems high but it is a serious piece of cutting edge technology and is not cheap to operate and promote. Is the real problem that our profession has always undersold its skills and when a high tarrif treatment is offered to it, there is a collective lack of self belief that we deserve to have it?
What would our profession prefer? Perhaps the company deciding that it should be placed with the beauty industry or the dermatologists? Thus removing us again from the chain of real treatment.
If anyone would like contact details of the principals involved, contact me. They are astonishingly easy to come by. In fact I know one poster already has had contact but seems to not have updated the forum.
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Old 10th September 2009, 09:51 AM
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Default Re: Laser treatment for nail fungus

Ok brilliant serious people have developed this product. I would like to see their SAT scores to confirm of course.

What is the mechanism and rationale for its use?

A Doctor who doesn't understand what and why he is using a modality or procedure thoroughly should not get involved with it.

I am interested in why it works and am open minded.
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Old 10th September 2009, 03:48 PM
hamish dow hamish dow is offline
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Default

What do you mean by SAT tests? this seem to refer to "standardized test for college admissions in the United States". So specifically what do you mean?

What is the mechanism and rationale for its use?
Much of the Technical spec is proprietary as I mentioned in the previous thread you have moved from and is therefore protected by patent.

I totally agree that if one does not have any idea about the medium or its applications one should avoid using it. However to repeat what I posted previously on the original post; for really in depth information contact Professor David Harris Senior Research Fellow in Otolaryngology at the University of Washington, Seattle. Dr Harris has expertise in neuroscience, photomedicine and photobiology with over 150 publications in 12 medical specialties. He has chaired 28 Medical/Scientific Conferences and Sessions, and organized over 100 CME training courses for physicians. Since 1980.
You will find his cv here.
http://www.patholase.com/sites/all/t...rrisCV2006.pdf
In all Likelyhood quite why some of it works might be unknown but as each pathogen and cellular component has a tolerance level that it can exist within, the modality takes it beyond its point of survival, thus rendering it non functional. As it opertates at wavelengths of @ 1064 it is in the infrared end of the spectrum and it will largely pass through tissue without causing any harm.
I am convinced that to answer your very specific question you must go to the source. In all likelyhood
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