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Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

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  #1  
Old 5th May 2009, 12:31 PM
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Default Re: Leg length discrepency how do you measure clincally?

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Interestingly, the owner of an orthotic lab here in the UK is doing a PhD in LLD.

He has absorbed a practise from kinesiology (yes, it's true!) where you get your patient to stand with different heel raise levels under the short limb and "press" on their out-stretched arm. At the point they can resist the operator's downward pressing the strongest, they are considered to be standing on the best heel raise (or sole raise) for them !!!

Interesting thing is though, that while he has brought this in from kinesiology, an orthopaedic lower limb surgeon I work with, suggested that it may simply be that our upper body and torso is strongest when our sacral base is level. (ie, back to the ASIS/PSIS exam for a LLD)

Maybe something for you to critique Charlotte in your MSc
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Old 6th May 2009, 12:35 AM
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Default Re: Leg length discrepency how do you measure clincally?

Quote:
He has absorbed a practise from kinesiology (yes, it's true!) where you get your patient to stand with different heel raise levels under the short limb and "press" on their out-stretched arm. At the point they can resist the operator's downward pressing the strongest, they are considered to be standing on the best heel raise (or sole raise) for them !!!

Interesting thing is though, that while he has brought this in from kinesiology, an orthopaedic lower limb surgeon I work with, suggested that it may simply be that our upper body and torso is strongest when our sacral base is level. (ie, back to the ASIS/PSIS exam for a LLD)


What about the good old ideomotor effect?! Tested and repeatable (very). Be interesting to see the methodology but I wonder how this very very powerful effect has been eliminated from the methodology?!

The ideomotor effect, for them as don't know, is the mechanism for subconscious movement. These are movements which happen below the level of awareness and the subject is not aware they are making them. The classical experiment is the Ouija board wherein people can honestly believe that the glass is moving under its own power and not being pushed by them.

An experiment was carried out wherein a Ouija was used but the tester had placed a thin glass disk atop the glass so the fingers rested on this. Who can guess what moved, the glass or the disk?

The effect is also easily reproducible under hypnosis and is often used by hypnotists who believe the "special state" model to "prove" their position. Again, it has been shown that appropriately motivated individuals can achieve all of the phenomena without recourse to hypnosis.

Pendulum dowsing is another example. With a modestly suggestable subject you can cause a pendulum held by them to swing in a line or a circle as you suggest to them that it should be so. However many a pregnant mother will do this to try to derive the gender of her child and beleive that it happens because her body "knows" what it is carrying. *

As Occam points out "Pluralitas non est ponenda sine neccesitate". One should look first to the known and established reasons for the changes in muscle power (ideomotor) before seeking the esoteric! Standardise the strength of the pull, eliminate the patients, and the clinicians knowledge of what wedges are where (double blind) and test for repeatability and we may have an area of interest! Perhaps that is what he is doing.

Regards
Skeptical Bob


* my wife, to my considerable frustration (which i'm sure is why she did it), did this both times she was pregnant. It worked precisely half the time .
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Old 6th May 2009, 03:49 AM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

I have copied the above two posts from the thread on Leg length discrepency how do you measure clincally? as this applied kinesiology technique comes up often.
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Old 6th May 2009, 03:58 AM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Does anyone actually know the name of this test? Better, yet anyone seen a video on Youtube of it (I can't find one).
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Old 7th May 2009, 05:41 PM
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Default Re: Leg length discrepency how do you measure clincally?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kahuna View Post
where you get your patient to stand with different heel raise levels under the short limb and "press" on their out-stretched arm. At the point they can resist the operator's downward pressing the strongest, they are considered to be standing on the best heel raise (or sole raise) for them !!!

Interesting thing is though, that while he has brought this in from kinesiology, an orthopaedic lower limb surgeon I work with, suggested that it may simply be that our upper body and torso is strongest when our sacral base is level. (ie, back to the ASIS/PSIS exam for a LLD)
For those that have not taken any course work in applied kinesiology taught by certified instructors, the test described above is not taught. The main reason is that the muscle test is used on one muscle, not a group of muscles.

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Stanley
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Old 23rd May 2009, 04:45 PM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

I did some digging around on this and found this from PM News:

Quote:
Stability Maneuver (Dwight L. Bates, DPM)
RE: Stability Maneuver (Dwight L. Bates, DPM)
From: Multiple Respondents

This maneuver is used commonly by individuals
attempting to "prove" to an unsuspecting public
that the foot inserts that they are standing on
give them "increased foot stability." The
physics of this maneuver, like most "magic
tricks," is quite simple, but also quite clever.

The subject is first asked to stand without the
inserts under their feet with their hands palm
up in front of their bodies, with their forearms
horizontal. The salesman then applies a force
with their hands in a vertical direction onto
the subject's hands. Since the axis of rotation
with the ground for a standing individual is at
their plantar feet, and since the salesman's
applied force vector is directed anterior to
this axis of rotation at the plantar feet, the
applied force from the salesman will cause a
rotational force (i.e., moment) that will tend
to make the subject rotate forward at their
feet, thus tending to make the subject lose
their balance forward and feel "unstable."

Next, the subject is asked to stand on top of
both of the shoe inserts, again with their
forearms horizontal and hands palm up. The
salesman then applies what he says is the same
force to the subject's hands. The salesman now,
however, instead of applying a directly vertical
force, is making sure he is applying a vertical
and slightly posteriorally-directed force into
the subject’s hands. Since the applied force
vector from the salesman now is directed toward
the feet of the subject, instead of anterior to
the feet as before, the subject will not
experience any rotational force that will make
him tend to lose their balance forward. The
subject will only feel their feet pressing more
firmly onto the shoe inserts, thus imparting a
sense of "stability" from the shoe inserts.

Kevin A. Kirby, DPM, Sacramento, CA,


The maneuver is supposed to be an applied
kinesiology test. The muscle test and the
accuracy of it is the key to this discipline. It
is not easy to do accurately, and requires
practice and skill. The muscle test is looking
for the ability of the muscle to summate, not
necessarily strength. When a muscle summates, it
locks. When it is not summating, you can feel
the fibers slide. Dysponesis can alter the
results.

The problem with the test described, is a
patient/subject can easily recruit other
muscles. A little twist of the body, and the
patient/subject can easily recruit the
supraspinatus. For this reason, more commonly
the infraspinatus muscle is tested in the upper
extremity.

The trick with this test is that if the
patient/subject is not given enough time to
recruit the muscle, the muscle will not be able
to summate. Properly performed, the
patient/subject would have to press against the
examiners hand to contract the muscle before the
examiner gradually increases the force. If the
examiner starts to increase the force before the
patient/subject can contract the muscle fully,
then there will be failure. Another way to
influence the test is to say something to the
patient/subject just about the time the test is
to be performed. This will distract the subject,
so a full contraction will not occur.

Stanley Beekman, DPM, Cleveland, OH


This reminds me of the parlor trick
of "levitation." A group of people place their
hands beneath the thighs of a seated person and
attempt to lift him. Difficult. Then they hold
their hands out above his head, steady, for a
few minutes. Then they lift him again. He goes
up as easily as a feather. Try it.

The baloney explanation consists of energy
fields, auras, etc. I don't know the real
explanation, but I suspect that the act of
preparing to lift, with everyone holding out
their arms, concentrating, breathing, makes each
person's individual effort on the second attempt
a bit more efficient and the combined effort a
bit more synchronized. All of that
makes for a dramatically easier lift. Something
similar here is probably at work.

Steven D Epstein, DPM, Lebanon, PA,
sdepstein@yahoo.com


They push straight down with the orthotics ,
then with out the orthotics they pull more down
and at an angle...that’s the trick, if you
really want to call it a trick.

Ronnie Bateh, DPM, Jacksonville, FL


They usually pull down on your arms at the wrist
when you are "unstable", then grab you above the
elbows when you are "stabilized." Obviously,
the closer they get to your shoulder, the
stronger you get. Try it

Peter Smith, DPM, Stony Brook, NY,
smithdpm@ix.netcom.com


This sounds akin to applied kinesiology. It has
to do with neuromuscular response from stimuli
of all kinds. The bottom line is; if something
agrees with your body-mind your strength
increases. If something disagrees you will
weaken. It is a great tool, and I'm not sure why
we do not learn to use it with our biomechanical
treatments, [except for the all important
scientific validation requirement}. A local
chiropractor I network with uses it, and figures
out all kinds of little modifications for me to
add to my patients orthotics [3 mm. lateral heel
wedge, 5 mm. cuboid, 3 mm. navicular, 7.mm. heel
raise]. Countless times there is a marked
improvement in my patients following the
modification.

Mitchell R. Mosher, DPM, Roseville, CA
http://www.podiatrym.com/pmnews.cfm
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  #7  
Old 23rd May 2009, 07:04 PM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Have a look at this for some snake oil:

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Old 24th May 2009, 06:39 AM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Admin View Post
Have a look at this for some snake oil:

This morning I watched this and then went to test it out on the other half. I didn't tell her what it was about, I just performed the tests as described. I asked her to hold out her arm and say "I am a women"; test= strong. Then I asked her to say "I am a man"; test = strong. I told her she's a hermaphrodite and got a slap. Can I sue these charlatans?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermaphrodite
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Old 24th May 2009, 08:31 AM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Simon and Craig:

I watched the video and of course it initially seems like hocus pocus. However, on further reflection, I don't see why this sort of change in apparent muscle strength with different types of central nervous system (CNS) "mental imaging" should necessarily be considered "snake oil" without further investigation.

Even when individuals are asked to sustain a maximal volitional contraction of a muscle group,we know that the CNS does not fully recruit all the available motor units (motor unit = motoneuron + all its axonal branches + all muscle fibers contacted by those branches) at any one time. They are discharged in various orders, generally from small to larger motor units, with significant inhibition of motor units from the CNS also.

We also know that some individuals, when confronted with life and death situations are able to perform what seem like superhuman feats, called "hysterical strength". Feats of hysterical strength are thought to be due to the CNS reducing any inhibitory input to the muscles and recruiting all the available motor units at the same time, all to generate these remarkable external forces that may allow, for example, a mother to lift an automobile off of her child.

Weight lifting or throwing athletes also sometimes have remarkable days where they can lift more or throw significantly farther than on other days, creating personal records or even world records, which may also be reasonably explained by the CNS optimizing their motor unit recruitment patterns so that they can maximize their physical performance as may be suggested by the following research paper.

Quote:
From mental power to muscle power—gaining strength by using the mind

Vinoth K. Ranganathan, Vlodek Siemionow, Jing Z. Liu, Vinod Sahgal and Guang H. Yue

a Department of Biomedical Engineering/ND20, The Lerner Research Institute, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA

b Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA

c Orthopedic Research Center, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA


Received 3 February 2003; Revised 17 June 2003; accepted 20 November 2003. Available online 3 February 2004.

Abstract

The purposes of this project were to determine mental training-induced strength gains (without performing physical exercises) in the little finger abductor as well as in the elbow flexor muscles, which are frequently used during daily living, and to quantify cortical signals that mediate maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) of the two muscle groups. Thirty young, healthy volunteers participated in the study. The first group (N=8) was trained to perform “mental contractions” of little finger abduction (ABD); the second group (N=8) performed mental contractions of elbow (ELB) flexion; and the third group (N=8) was not trained but participated in all measurements and served as a control group. Finally, six volunteers performed training of physical maximal finger abductions. Training lasted for 12 weeks (15 min per day, 5 days per week). At the end of training, we found that the ABD group had increased their finger abduction strength by 35% (P<0.005) and the ELB group augmented their elbow flexion strength by 13.5% (P<0.001). The physical training group increased the finger abduction strength by 53% (P<0.01). The control group showed no significant changes in strength for either finger abduction or elbow flexion tasks. The improvement in muscle strength for trained groups was accompanied by significant increases in electroencephalogram-derived cortical potential, a measure previously shown to be directly related to control of voluntary muscle contractions. We conclude that the mental training employed by this study enhances the cortical output signal, which drives the muscles to a higher activation level and increases strength.
Therefore, because of these facts, I would not readily assume that distraction of the CNS with different thought processes or "mental images" does not change the external forces generated by maximal volitional contractions such as in the video shown above. Of course, if you wanted to perform this experiment correctly, a force gauge would be need to be used to quantify the force generated by the muscles using different mental images in the subject to see the percentage change in force and whether this is a consistent observation, or just a random isolated observation that is being video-taped for promotion of some other product.

Sounds like a job for ..........the Podiatry Arena Myth Busters!!

(By the way, good to see some CNS-muscle physiology stuff here. Don't assume this subject is not extremely important as I have found that most podiatrists have very little knowledge of this subject.)
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Last edited by Kevin Kirby : 24th May 2009 at 08:59 AM.
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Old 24th May 2009, 10:22 AM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Admin View Post
Davinci - thanks. I did a really extensive search on this when this thread first came up and could find next to nothing on it. I used a wide variety of keywords in the search engines and couldn't find a thing. I did not use the keyword 'stability maneuver'. But searching for that term does not provide much either. I am really tring to find a reference from the applied kinesiology literature on this test.

Anyone?
Here is a reference I think you will find helpful. Please note the discussion of the test seen in the video.

http://www.chiroandosteo.com/content/16/1/16

Also on the video, even if the test of a group of muscles was valid, look at the speed of the test. A proper test would have a slowly increasing force, not a quick force that would not give time for the muscle units to summate.


Regards,

Stanley
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Old 28th May 2009, 12:45 PM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Hi All
I have very little experience or knowledge of AK except from one patient who made almost weekly visits to her kinesiologist. She was frequently told that she lacked a variety of either vitamins, minerals or both or was allergic to all manner of things! and returned from said appointment with a large bag of pills at 30 or 40 quid a throw.
60 foot long anaconda oil methinks
Regards
Deborah
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Old 29th May 2009, 07:37 AM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

I followed up on one of the books promoted in the video:
Power vs. Force: The Hidden Determinants of Human Behavior by David R. Hawkins
At amazon.com, it has 167 5star reviews and 25 1star review. Here are come quotes from the 1* reviews:
Quote:
This book would be funny if it wasn't so scary.This man claims to be an MD and as far as I know still has a license. If you have a degree in math, physics, engineering or something similar, this book can pretty entertaining. It is fun to pick apart,but as a source of truth it is worthless.
Quote:
I have a rule: never take seriously anything that discusses quantum physics unless it contains equations. Although Dr. Hawkins makes numerous references to "advanced theoretical physics" he never ties it to anything in his work. Thus the book is full of questionable science
Quote:
If you want to know just how bad and unscientific this book is, try referring to the foot notes. The footnotes as presented are untraceable as to origin. Why would someone do this?
Quote:
As pointed out in previous reviews the use of his own method to test his method is as sound of scientific practice as testing for witches by drowning them.
Quote:
I don't write reviews often, but I had to say something about this book. With several great reviews and a friend of mind bragging about it, I had high hopes for it. I was really looking for a good read!
Unfortunately, I'm quite disappointed. I have a in degree in physics and try to think logically about things, and most importantly don't completely accept things on blind faith. This is an obvious stumbling block for the book. Little factual info, mixed with lots of claims that have to be taken on faith.

The author addresses this concern directly by pretty much telling me I'm "limited" in some way. The author basically directly says it. If you believe in the time proven scientific method, then you are just limited or it's just a perception problem. (Now isn't that clever!)

I totally understand the author's problem with a person like me. I require something, anything, to substantiate or validate in some microscopic way the huge claims he makes one after another. The basic scientific method is probably quite bothersome to him because it's just "one way" of accessing information. The other way is to apparently just believe anything the author writes without any solid evidence of anything.
Quote:
A quick search on PubMed will reveal that "Applied Kinesiology" has failed every attempt at scientific rigor. No double-blind study has ever supported his conclusions and even the most cautious reviewers opine that there is no scientific basis to believe any of this man's claims.

More digging only yields more questions - Hawkins received his PhD from the never-accredited, now discredited, Columbia Pacific University - an institution characterized by the California Attorney General as "a diploma mill".

In short, there are serious doubts as to the majority of the factual claims presented in this book. The metaphysical mumbo-jumbo is past my pay grade (I'm just a scientist, after all) and is untestable at any rate (although I have my doubts on that too).
Quote:
I have seen a number of people who have fallen into believing in Applied Kinesiology. This book is a very good exposition of the basic beliefs of this 'cult'. I give it one star as it does honestly express those beliefs.
Quote:
After recently reading this book, and trying to absorb and understand the ideas presented therein, I have to tell the truth. "Power" is one of the worst-written books I have ever read, regardless of the subject matter. Undoubtedly one of the worst books on human behavior and 'spirituality/enlightenment' ever published. I don't think Dr. Hawkins has anything to be proud of in this work.

There are several major problems with this ridiculous book. First of all, Hawkins makes many statements we are supposed to accept as truth (his truth, of course), but offers no evidence at all that any of his claims are true. He makes only passing references to a few obscure studies and research projects, but it turns out that most were done by him and his own team of experts in 'applied kinesiology'. He uses his own research and studies to prove his own claims. This in itself is highly suspicious and unethical behavior, especially for someone with his credentials. No legitimate scientist would ever conduct research in this way! Talk about self-serving!
Quote:
Bottom line: this is a frustrating and annoying book. If you are looking for the 'truth' about human behavior, you definitly won't find it here. In my opinion, not worth the considerable time and effort required to read it.
Quote:
the use of mathematics in this book is unbearably bad. And the "science" is, at best, pseudo-science. He uses his own methods to assess those same methods. His results don't hold up to double-blinded experiments, and require the researcher to be specifically seeking out the outcomes that will support the theory. In general, you should be suspicious of any theory which specifically states within it that only evidence in support of it should be considered, and that contradictory results should be ignored.
Quote:
As others have pointed out what scientific trappings the author attempts to cover this naked absurdity in are threadbare, badly patched together, misnamed, misunderstood and misapplied.

The only nice thing I can say about this or any author's other books is that they are well bound volumes. The contents is pure mind-rot.
Quote:
No thinking person with any level of consciousness would/ could buy into this masterpiece of pure fiction
Quote:
This writer is still at a very rudimentary level of spiritual awareness and completely deluded about his own degree of perceptivity and insight.
Quote:
This book bothered me a lot.
The author begins by presenting himself and his spiritual quest and accomplishments. He tells us that he attained high states of consciousness. I guess this is done as a substitute to any scientific proof of what follows.
Quote:
This book is a collection of the greatest bunch of pseudoscientific nonsense I've ever come across. The author uses scientific and pseudoscientific words in sentences that ostensibly reveal some truth, but in essence mean nothing, or make so many presuppositions that the claimed scientific validity of the entire volume is exposed as an elaborate hoax. Many other statements are so rediculous the book becomes a hilarious comedy, if not for the knowledge that some people may actually believe this. The whole thing smacks of cultish deceiving and misleading. Don't waste your time.
And this gem:
Quote:
Look at the dates for all the 5-star reviews. Is someone trying to BS us or what?
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Old 29th May 2009, 01:24 PM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Obviously, David Hawkins, and the rest of the charlatans do not know Applied Kinesiology. Anyone that has taken any course work by an approved instructor by the International College of Applied Kinesiology, would know that the type and manner of testing and what it is supposed to show is not in accordance with anything that is formally taught. Geroge Goodheart was concerned about his discipline getting hijacked by the know nothings, so he established the International College of Applied Kinesiology to prevent this from happening.
I can only liken this to what I see with orthoses. Imagine that there is a shoe store salesman who gets taught by a massage therapist who learned foot biomechanics by working in an office of a chiropractor. Imaagine this same fellow is selling arch supports and is using a theory he developed to substantiate what he is doing. I am sure that what is spewed is not going to resemble the intellectual discussions on this list serve. In fact, if he tried to post some of his wacky theories on an orthopedic listserve, they would have a field day tearing down the whole profession of podiatric medicine. What does this shoe store salesman have to do with podiatry? The same as the charlatans that talk about using an improper test performed imporperly to tell if the person is doing something good for the universe-absolutely nothing.

Stanley
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Old 30th May 2009, 05:36 PM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Thanks Stanley. I actually find this kind of stuff fun! The fanaticism that so many pursue a cause (whether it being the loony left politics; the above version of 'applied kinesiology'; running barefoot; root biomechanics; religion etc). The parallels between them all are uncanny; the nature of the arguments they use; what they think 'science' actually is; the way they handle contradictory evidence; the illogical baffling arguments; the way they respond to criticisms; etc are all the same! It make it fun to bait them!

The best part is when they get backed into a corner the hate mail campaigns they run and even death threats they make! (ever watch Bill O'Reilly on Fox? Even though he is on the right; the best part of his show is at the end when he reads out his hate mail from the loonie left! He is cleverly making the left look really stupid by reading the threats he gets, and thereby strengthening his argument!)
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Old 31st May 2009, 01:39 AM
Ian Linane Ian Linane is offline
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

OMG - I was a religious minister for many years , I do comp' medicine and use acupuncture point to treat emotional distress . I guess now it is confirmed that I have really lost the plot

Actually Craig I would agree that it is not the fervor, nor the passion that is ever the problem but the peculiar trait we can all possess towards an unquestioning fanaticism in any area: Religion, medicine, skepticism, science, dismissiveness.

Equally I'd agree with Stanley that it is often the way others take an approach, market it and do the approach poorly that can so often undermine that which may be good in a thing.

I guess I've been exposed educationally to much religious and spiritual thinking and practice, absorbed and studied the more esoteric comp' med approaches to good benefit and been exposed educationally to a more scientific approach and been able to re-evaluate much of life's experience and education from that perspective as well.

None the wiser of course, but an interesting journey.

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Old 23rd October 2010, 03:03 PM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Not 100% connected to this thread, but couldn't find a better one to add this post to, and not convinced it was worthy of its own new thread. [It smells like applied kinesiology to me, but if not then Admin please feel free to move to another thread.]

Topic of discussion: The Power Balance bracelet.

Came across this a while ago as quite a few of my sports patients were wearing them (particularly the golfers) and anecdotally reporting that they noticed huge differences in their performance. The bracelets are described as "performance technology that uses holograms embedded with frequencies that react positively with your body’s natural energy field". Sounded like BS to me but a quick look on their website and it seems some big name sports stars (Shaq to name the biggest) subscribe to them. Placebo effect? Lucky charm effect? Does it matter?

Heres the UK website: http://www.powerbalanceuk.com/

And if you're still not convinced then surely there's no arguing with this science:



So mine was delivered middle of last week.

Haven't played golf (or any sport) with it yet, but was dicking around with it in my hotel room with a couple of mates whilst at the SCP conference the last few days. We performed the tests as shown in the above you tube clip. Sceptical is an understatement. Just in the process of trying to come up with a decent way to do these tests with the subject a bit more 'blinded'.

Anyone common across this? Any personal experience of it? Thoughts?

IG
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Old 23rd October 2010, 11:26 PM
CraigT CraigT is offline
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

The simple question I have to anyone who claims that these power bands do what they say-
Where is the study to demonstrate it?
The 'test' they do would be soooooo easy to turn into a double blind random trial, why hasn't it been done and published?
Until I see this... What a crock of s___! Should be called placebo bands...
I am sure this will be one day used as a demonstration of clever marketing. What do they sell for? About $60? What would they cost to make? About 50c? If that...
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Old 25th October 2010, 10:51 PM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

From Australia's 'Choice' magazine- the publication of the Australian Consumer's Association...
--------------------------
Power Balance bands - which claim to increase an athlete's performance through increasing the natural energy flow - is simply just a rubber band bracelet with a plastic hologram, Choice said.

Choice said the bracelet, which is "endorsed by sporting pros" and sells "for a mere $60 alongside claims it somehow makes you stronger, more poised and just better. The band was tested at Choice under controlled lab conditions, which showed it did little else than empty purchasers' wallets".
-------------------------------
It has picked up a "shonky" award for poor and misleading advertising
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Old 26th October 2010, 12:13 AM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Hey Craig,

Any more details on the methodology employed during these 'controlled lab conditions'?

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Ian
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Old 26th October 2010, 01:10 AM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Ian
I will follow up as I am actually a subscriber, but I only saw this in part of a newspaper article.
I would expect a little more rigorous methodology than in the video above...
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Old 26th October 2010, 03:02 AM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

http://www.choice.com.au/Reviews-and...roduction.aspx

Quote:
CHOICE conducted a small trial with a total of twenty males and females of various ages and fitness levels. They performed a set of tests including walking on a balance beam and performing rotational stretches to the limit of their flexibility. They did these exercises three times (with a long rest between each session), once without wearing any Power Balance products, once again wearing a Power Balance wristband and pendant, and again wearing another Power Balance wristband and pendant from which our lab tester had removed the holograms. All the products were masked with tape so triallists didn’t know which ones had the holograms; neither did the trial’s coordinator, making this a double-blind trial. Only after the trial was over did the lab tester reveal which set still had its holograms.

The result? All the triallists felt and performed very similarly in all three runs. Some believed they performed slightly better wearing the intact products – others while wearing the doctored products – but most felt and demonstrated no significant difference at all. The Power Balance products gave no obvious performance benefit.
Also this...
http://www.randi.org/site/index.php/...the-power.html
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Old 26th October 2010, 04:06 AM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Thaks Craig - that's a nice study. I was in the process of designing one myself but was going to use a different band for the control (like a Livestrong or Help for Heroes one). Didn't think about just removing the hologram...

Another one I'm dabbling with is a similar methodology but with a jacket they put on which either has the powerband in the pocket or not (they say you don't need to wear it; just need to 'have it on your person' for it to work!)

On an anecdotal note, I spoke to a guy at my golf club recently who wears one. He is a retired engineer, so has a very logical mind and perhaps unsurprisingly likes to know how everything works. (The kind of kid who dismantled and put back together his VHS player I imagine). Anyway, he swears since wearing this band his golf game has transformed - he has won several monthly medals and cut his handicap by 6 shots. When I hinted at the placebo effect he winked at me and said "I'll take it"
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Old 26th October 2010, 08:04 AM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Seems odd to have to carry out a study into the blindingly obvious!!
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Old 26th October 2010, 02:52 PM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Doh! I was going to start to put holograms on my patients orthotics. Everyone knows that holograms work better when closer to the ground.

Eric
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Old 27th October 2010, 01:20 PM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Hi Craig, Kevin and all,

AK might be an interesting read for those interested, or a fun trick to play on a mate at a party after a few beers, however for some reason I appear to be lab owning PhD researcher mentioned at the start of this thread, which is the only true bit. But for some reason the originator of this thread has me down as assessing all my patients with AK. I remember a very long time ago having fun with it for a couple of hours with a visiting podiatrist to our lab, which he introduced me to, however sadly folks I am not a believer. For me I'm afraid it's all about off-loading ascending and descending forces from painful areas, created by displacement of the COM due to leg length inequality. Nothing as exciting as AK etc However, I would be delighted to show the originator of this thread what we do and share a coffee. You can even have your own mug :-)

Clifton
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Old 27th October 2010, 01:54 PM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Hologram mug?
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Old 27th October 2010, 01:58 PM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Powerbalance band update....

A patient of mine invited me to his golf course in Essex today. What a perfect opportunity for me to wear my new fancy wrist band I thought. (Not so much a RCT as a field test). This was my first outing for almost a fortnight due to a minor lumbar spine issue. And...

I shot a personal best.
Beat my previous PB by 3 strokes.
Handicap dropped.
And then I met Clive Allen in the changing rooms* (this a big deal for a Tottenham Hotspur fan).

Do I believe in Applied Kinesiology or in the 'science' behind the Power Balance band? No. I'm with you guys - it's probably a load of cobblers. Will I be wearing it when I play again on Saturday? Hell yeah.

*I'm willing to concede this may have had nothing to do with the Power Balance band.
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Old 3rd January 2011, 04:27 PM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

The press release none of us are surprised by... Power balance bands are a con: http://gizmo.do/eJxvLX
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Old 3rd January 2011, 04:47 PM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian View Post
Powerbalance band update....

A patient of mine invited me to his golf course in Essex today. What a perfect opportunity for me to wear my new fancy wrist band I thought. (Not so much a RCT as a field test). This was my first outing for almost a fortnight due to a minor lumbar spine issue. And...

I shot a personal best.
Beat my previous PB by 3 strokes.
Handicap dropped.
And then I met Clive Allen in the changing rooms* (this a big deal for a Tottenham Hotspur fan).

Do I believe in Applied Kinesiology or in the 'science' behind the Power Balance band? No. I'm with you guys - it's probably a load of cobblers. Will I be wearing it when I play again on Saturday? Hell yeah.

*I'm willing to concede this may have had nothing to do with the Power Balance band.
Ian:

If you removed your Power Balance band from around your putter and put it on your wrist, you would note even more improvements.
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Old 3rd January 2011, 04:59 PM
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Default Re: Applied kinesiology and foot orthotics: True or scam?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Kirby View Post
Ian:

If you removed your Power Balance band from around your putter and put it on your wrist, you would note even more improvements.


The way I putted today couldn't have been much worse if someone had catapulted the band directly into my eyeballs.
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