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Melanoma of the foot

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  #1  
Old 29th October 2009, 07:19 PM
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Default Melanoma of the foot

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Management of primary cutaneous melanoma of the hands and feet: a clinicoprognostic study.
Rex J, Paradelo C, Mangas C, Hilari JM, Fernández-Figueras MT, Ferrándiz C.
Dermatol Surg. 2009 Oct;35(10):1505-13.
Quote:
BACKGROUND: Although acral lentiginous melanoma is the most common subtype of malignant melanoma in acral locations, the term acral melanoma (AM) has to be differentiated from the histopathologic description.

OBJECTIVES: To characterize the clinical and pathologic features of patients with a primary AM and to elucidate whether the prognosis of patients with AM differs from that of those with melanoma at other sites (nonacral melanoma; NAM).

PATIENTS AND METHOD: Over a 20-year period, a series of 822 consecutive patients with melanoma were recorded in the database. Clinical and follow-up data were retrieved from the melanoma register and prospectively analyzed.

RESULTS: Eighty-nine patients had a malignant melanoma located on the acral sites of extremities. Breslow thickness and Clark level were found to be related to specific and disease-free survival. Breslow thickness greater than 4 mm was associated with greater risk of recurrence, and amelanosis and age of 60 and older were significantly associated with greater risk of death. Comparison of survival of patients with AM with that of those with NAM clearly showed that disease-free survival and overall survival were significantly lower in the former.

CONCLUSION: Survival differences between patients with AM and NAM are due to differences in already known prognostic factors, probably as a consequence of a delay in the diagnosis in these locations.
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Old 3rd November 2009, 04:14 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Melanoma of the feet: misdiagnosed and misunderstood.
Albreski D, Sloan SB.
Clin Dermatol. 2009 Nov-Dec;27(6):556-63.
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Acral lentiginous melanoma of the foot is a relatively rare but often very aggressive variant of melanoma. More commonly identified in patients with darker skin, diagnosis of the lesions is often delayed because the area is not routinely examined by patients or primary care physicians. In addition, these lesions often mimic other entities, including vascular lesions and infections. Greater awareness of this entity and performing appropriate biopsies will result in more timely diagnoses and improved survival.
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Old 6th October 2010, 03:46 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Development of a practical guide for the early recognition of malignant melanoma of the foot and nail unit.
Bristow IR, de Berker DA.
J Foot Ankle Res. 2010 Sep 28;3(1):22.
Quote:
BACKGROUND: Malignant melanoma is a rare but potentially lethal form of cancer which may arise on the foot. Evidence suggests that due to misdiagnosis and later recognition, foot melanoma has a poorer prognosis than cutaneous melanoma elsewhere.

METHODS: A panel of experts representing podiatry and dermatologists with a special interest in skin oncology was assembled to review the literature and clinical evidence to develop a clinical guide for the early recognition of plantar and nail unit melanoma.

RESULTS: A systematic review of the literature revealed little high quality data to inform the guide. However a significant number of case reports and series were available for analysis. From these, the salient features were collated and summarised into the guide. Based on these features a new acronym "CUBED" for foot melanoma was drafted and incorporated in the guide.

CONCLUSIONS: The use of this guide may help clinicians in their assessment of suspicious lesions on the foot (including the nail unit). Earlier detection of suspicious pedal lesions may facilitate earlier referral for expert assessment and definitive diagnosis. The guide has been tested amongst practitioners and has been submitted for publication.
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  #4  
Old 2nd November 2010, 12:49 AM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Clinical guidelines for the recognition of melanoma of the foot and nail unit
Ivan R Bristow, David AR de Berker, Katharine M Acland, Richard J Turner and Jonathan Bowling
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research 2010, 3:25doi:10.1186/1757-1146-3-25
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Malignant melanoma is a life threatening skin tumour which may arise on the foot. The prognosis for the condition is good when lesions are diagnosed and treated early. However, lesions arising on the soles and within the nail unit can be difficult to recognise leading to delays in diagnosis. These guidelines have been drafted to alert health care practitioners to the early signs of the disease so an early diagnosis can be sought.
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  #5  
Old 1st March 2012, 05:04 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Prognostic variables and surgical management of foot melanoma: review of a 25-year institutional experience.
Rashid OM, Schaum JC, Wolfe LG, Brinster NK, Neifeld JP.
ISRN Dermatol. 2011;2011:384729.
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Introduction. Cutaneous foot melanoma is rare, challenging to manage, and not adequately examined in the literature. This study evaluated the prognostic variables and surgical management of foot melanoma.

Materials and Methods. Foot melanoma cases managed at an academic center from 1985 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed.

Results. 46 patients were identified with a broad range of demographic characteristics. Overall recurrence was 32.6%: 19% acral lentiginous, 57% nodular, 66% superficial spreading, 30% melanoma unspecified, 50% severely atypical; 53% ulcerated, 23% nonulcerated; 29% on the dorsum of the foot, 17% heel, 60% ankle, 22% toe, 50% plantar; 0% <1 mm thick, 47% 1-4 mm, 33% >4 mm. 13 had positive nodes, 4 (31%) of whom recurred. Prognostic factors and recurrence did not correlate, and survival was 96% with a median followup of 91 months.

Conclusions. Aggressive management of foot melanoma may result in excellent long-term survival even following disease recurrence.
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Old 1st September 2012, 06:14 AM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

A rare form of melanoma masquerading as a diabetic foot ulcer: a case report.
Thomas S, Meng YX, Patel VG, Strayhorn G.
Case Report Endocrinol. 2012;
Quote:
Background. Acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM) is a less-common form of melanoma in US, and it accounts for about 5% of all diagnosed melanomas in US. ALM is often overlooked until it is well advanced because of the lesion's location and its atypical appearance in the early stages. We present a case of ALM initially presented as a diabetic foot ulcer.

Case Report. An 81-year-old man initially presented to the primary care clinic with a right foot diabetic ulcer. There was a large plantar, dark-colored ulcer that bled easy. Initial excision biopsy revealed Clark's Level IV ALM. Subsequent definitive wide excision and sentinel node biopsy confirmed ALM with metastasis to inguinal lymph nodes (stage IIIb). The treatment included wide margin excision of the lesion with en bloc amputations of 4th and 5th toes, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy.

Discussion. The development of ALM may potentially relate to diabetes as a reported higher prevalence of diabetes with ALM patients.

Conclusion. The difficulty in early diagnosing of ALM remains as a formidable challenge particularly in diabetic patients who commonly develop plantar foot ulcers due to the diabetic neuropathy. This case reiterates the importance of a thorough foot exam in such patients.
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  #7  
Old 1st October 2012, 06:06 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Malignant melanoma on the foot
Hashmi, Farina
Dermatological Nursing, Volume 11, Number 3, September 2012 , pp. 40-45(6)
Quote:
The incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM) in the UK has notably increased over the last few decades. Despite recent improvements in the early diagnosis of the condition, the mortality rates are still high (UK Skin Cancer Mortality Statistics, SunSmart Campaign). Figures extracted from European studies also recognise that the stage (or thickness) at which the MM lesions are diagnosed has improved, leading to a slower increase in mortality compared to incidence rates (Grange, 2005, de Vries et al, 2003). These statistics are attributed to more and more people seeking professional advice at the early stages of MM presentation, as a result of increased public awareness and education programmes for both patients and practitioners (Schmid-Wendtner et al, 2002, Schwartz et al, 2002, Baumert et al, 2007, Russak, Rigel, 2012). The publicity surrounding the incidence and risk factor awareness of MM in the UK has been widespread over this past decade (UK Skin Cancer Mortality Statistics, SunSmart Campaign) and the publication of guidelines for both MM and subungual melanoma have contributed to the knowledge in this area (Bishop et al, 2007, Levit et al, 2000). Despite these positive outcomes, there are some MM on specific areas on the body that still have high mortality rates and therefore require further attention with regards to early diagnosis. One region in particular is the foot. This article will focus on this area, paying attention to the risk factors unique to foot MM (including the nail unit). Comparisons with other skin conditions and forms of MM will be made and new guidelines for assessment of MM on the foot introduced.
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  #8  
Old 10th October 2012, 12:51 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Press Release:
Melanoma - The wolf in sheep's clothing
Quote:
Researchers from the University of Bonn discover how melanoma cells circumvent the immune system

Melanoma is so dangerous because it tends to metastasize early on. New treatment approaches utilize, among other things, the ability of the immune defense to search out and destroy malignant cells. Yet this strategy is often only temporarily effective. A research team under the direction of Bonn University has discovered why this is the case: In the inflammatory reaction caused by the treatment, the tumor cells temporarily alter their external characteristics and thus become invisible to defense cells. This knowledge forms an important foundation for the improvement of combination therapies. The results have been published online in the renowned journal "Nature."

In Germany, approximately 15,000 people develop melanoma annually and approximately 2,000 people die from it every year. Malignant melanoma is the most frequently fatal skin diseases. The particular malignancy is based on the fact that small tumors can spread via the lymphatic vessels and the bloodstream. For many years, the working group under Prof. Dr. Thomas Tüting, Director of the Laboratory for Experimental Dermatology at the Bonn University Hospital, has investigated the effect of a targeted immune therapy with tumor-specific defense cells.

Tumor cells behave like a wolf in sheep's clothing

In trials on mice who congenitally develop melanoma, the researchers were able to destroy advanced tumors using so-called cytotoxic T-cells. "But they recover after some time - just as they do in patients in the hospital," explain Dr. Jennifer Landsberg and Dr. Judith Kohlmeyer, lead authors of the study. This form of therapy triggers inflammation. Now the researchers have discovered that the melanoma cells change their external characteristics precisely via this accompanying inflammatory reaction. "They behave like wolves in sheep's clothing and thus evade detection and destruction by defense cells," says Marcel Renn, also a lead author of the study.

The immune system can fight tumors – but it can also protect them

On the search for the underlying mechanisms, the researchers pointed histological investigations of tumors in the right direction: Therapy-resistant melanomas demonstrated a significantly stronger inflammatory reaction with many scavenger cells of the immune system, the so-called macrophages. A messenger primarily released from these immune cells - the tumor necrosis factor-alpha - was able to bring about the change in character of the melanoma cells directly in the Petri dish in the laboratory. Cells treated in this way were subsequently hardly detected by the defense cells. "The immune system is like a double-edged sword," explains Prof. Tüting. "It can fight the tumor – but it can also protect it." Such changes in the tumor tissue are probably of great importance for the formation of resistance to therapy. "According to more recent discoveries, treatment with inhibitors which prevent signal transmission in tumor cells is also affected by this," remarks Prof. Tüting.

Melanoma cells lose their typical characteristics

Molecular genetic investigations revealed that melanoma cells from therapy-resistant tumors had lost the characteristics typical for pigment cells. Instead, they demonstrated traits of connective tissue cells. "It is possible that melanoma cells undergo this change in character so easily because they originate from the embryonic development of cells in the neural crest which can also form connective tissue and nerve cells," says Prof. Dr. Michael Hölzel, co-author from the Institute for Clinical Pharmacology and Clinical Chemistry at the Bonn University Hospital.

Results can also be transferred to humans

Findings initially gained from laboratory mice were also able to be reproduced by the team of researchers with human melanoma cells and various associated defense cells in the Petri dish. The melanoma cells likewise reacted to the messenger tumor necrosis factor-alpha with a loss of pigment cell characteristics and could then no longer be detected by pigment-cell-specific defense cells. "Detection by other defense cells which can search out specific genetic changes in the melanoma cells was not affected by this, however," stresses Prof. Dr. Thomas Wölfel, director of a working group involved in the study at the Medical Clinic III of the Mainz University Hospital.

Important findings for new treatment strategies

As soon as the tumor necrosis factor alpha no longer had an effect on the human and mouse melanoma cells, however, the cells regained their pigment-cell characteristics. Then they were also able to be detected and fought against by all immune defense cells once more. All of these findings yield important information for new treatment strategies. Thus in the future, defense cells against antigens of various categories and specificity should be used and at the same time, the inflammation utilized by the tumor cells should be therapeutically inhibited. "Our experimental model system will help us to develop optimally effective combination therapies as rapidly as possible," says Prof. Tüting. "However, it will still take several years until the clinical application of strategies of this type."
###

Publication: Melanomas resist T-cell therapy through inflammation-induced reversible dedifferentiation, Nature, DOI: 10.1038/nature11538
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  #9  
Old 11th October 2012, 12:14 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Surgical treatment of primary melanoma.
Bennàssar A, Ishioka P, Vilalta A.
Dermatol Ther. 2012 Sep;25(5):432-442.
Quote:
The incidence of primary cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM) has been rapidly growing during the last decades with only a small rise in overall mortality. MM accounts for most of the deaths from skin malignancies due to its metastatic potential. However, early detection and wide surgical excision with histologically negative margins are nearly always curative for patients without micrometastatic disease. Although nonsurgical treatments have been increasingly used in recent years, surgery with standardized margins remains the only curative treatment modality for primary cutaneous MM. There are some special locations (e.g., the ear, nose, eyelid, genitalia, hand, or foot) where standardized wide surgery can not be completely achieved either for lack of tissue, ill-defined lesions, or cosmetic and functional reasons. Thus, skin surgeons dealing with these MMs should be well versed in new technologies such as confocal microscopy for the presurgical assessment of ill-defined lesions or the promising electrochemotherapy for nonsurgical tumors. Furthermore, a multidisciplinary melanoma team and a well-trained and experienced surgeon are mandatory to deal with these "out-of-the-guidelines" melanomas.
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Old 23rd October 2012, 12:41 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Malignant melanoma of the foot in patients with diabetes mellitus--a trap for the unwary.
Hussin P, Loke SC, Noor FM, Mawardi M, Singh VA.
Med J Malaysia. 2012 Aug;67(4):422-3.
Quote:
Melanomas on the foot are difficult to differentiate from diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). In particular, acral lentiginous and amelanotic melanomas have a high chance of being misdiagnosed. We present two patients with diabetes mellitus and malignant melanomas of the foot initially diagnosed as DFU. Both cases were treated with wide excision amputation and local dissection, without adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Both patients remain disease-free up to the last follow-up visit. It is important to maintain a high index of suspicion and a skin biopsy should be done in any DFU with atypical features.
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Old 1st November 2012, 06:40 AM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Pt has provided permission to share this:




Pt was advised by GP that the `black is only fungus....`

I referred for punch biopsy and results were subungual melanoma with Hutchinson sign. Gotta keep an eye out.
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  #12  
Old 12th January 2013, 01:04 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Clinical and histological features of melanoma in adult nigerians.
Atanda AT, Umar AB.
West Afr J Med. 2012 Jul-Aug;31(3):149-53.
Quote:
Background: Melanoma known to be common among Caucasians is increasingly getting more common among blacks in the tropics.

OBJECTIVE: To characterize the clinical and histological features of these tumours in adult Nigerians.

Methods: All cases of melanoma diagnosed between 2006 and 2010 in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria were retrieved and their clinical and pathological features reviewed.

Results: Eighty five cases comprising 41 males and 44 females were diagnosed with mean age of 56±14.6 years. Mean duration before presentation was 2.3±0.8 years. Eighty five percent of cases were located in the foot, 8% with lymph node involvement and seventy eight of the 85 cases were of Breslow thickness >4mm. Fifty five cases were of Clark level V and 78% of Nodular variant. Prognostic features including ulceration, lymphocytic infiltration, significant mitotic activity, satellitosis and lymphovascular infiltration were present in 69%, 38%, 16%, 45% and 17% of cases respectively. Only three cases were amelanotic.

Conclusion: Melanoma in the Nigerians is predominantly of the nodular variant and located in the foot, is characterized by late presentation and is generally associated with adverse prognostic features.
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Old 19th February 2013, 05:53 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Press release:
Gene linked to worse outcomes for melanoma
Quote:
Scientists at Queen Mary, University of London have identified a gene present in some melanoma which appears to make the tumour cells more resistant to treatment, according to research published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

The scientists discovered that the gene TP63 is unexpectedly expressed in some melanoma and correlates significantly with a worse prognosis. It is hoped this new understanding of what makes some melanoma cells so difficult to kill will help inform the development of new therapies.

Melanoma is a form of skin cancer which usually appears on the body as a new or changing mole. Almost 13,000 people in the UK are diagnosed with melanoma each year. While it is less common than other forms of skin cancer – around five per cent of skin cancers are melanoma – it results in around 75 per cent of skin cancer related deaths (more than 2000 deaths a year in the UK).

The number of cases of melanoma is rising faster than almost any other cancer and one of the main risk factors is ultraviolet light, which comes from the sun or sunbeds. While early-stage melanomas can often be removed by surgery, more advanced melanomas are much harder to treat.

Dr Daniele Bergamaschi, a senior lecturer in cutaneous research at Queen Mary said: "For most patients where the melanoma has spread beyond the skin, there are few effective treatments and overall survival rates for this disease have not changed much over the past 30 years.

"To develop better treatments we need to understand the basic biology underpinning why these cells are so resistant to being killed."

The researchers analysed 156 melanoma tissue samples from 129 individuals for expression of the protein p63 – the protein encoded by the gene TP63. They found that p63 was expressed in more than 50 per cent of the samples (58% of primary metastatic samples, 53% of recurrent samples and 66% of metastatic samples) and correlated significantly with death from melanoma.

Dr Bergamaschi said: "We did not expect to find the TP63 gene expressed in melanoma. It is not usually found in the melanocytes (skin pigment cells), which are the cells from which melanomas develop. However, it appears in some cases this gene is turned on as the tumour forms, and when it does it is linked to a worse prognosis."

The researchers suggest that the TP63 gene, and the subsequent production of the protein p63 in some melanoma, is inhibiting the apoptotic function of the protein p53. One of the main activities mediated by p53 is apoptosis – the process of programmed cell death and one of the main mechanisms by which cancer cells die.

Dr Bergamaschi said: "The apoptotic pathway is often not working in melanoma. However this is not explained by mutations in the TP53 gene, which encodes for the p53 protein, as evidence suggests this is mutated in less than 10 per cent of melanoma.

"This work suggests that in a significant number of cases it is actually the protein p63 which is inhibiting p53's apoptotic function, making some tumours more resistant to treatment. We therefore suggest that p63 should be considered when designing new treatments for melanoma which are focused on re-activating the apoptotic pathway in order to make the cancer cells easier to kill."
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Old 22nd February 2013, 02:30 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Cutaneous malignant melanoma: clinical and histopathological review of cases in a Malaysian tertiary referral centre.
Pailoor J, Mun KS, Leow M.
Malays J Pathol. 2012 Dec;34(2):97-101.
Quote:
Melanoma is a lethal skin cancer that occurs predominantly among Caucasians. In Malaysia, the incidence of melanoma is low. This is a retrospective study of clinical and histopathological features of patients with cutaneous melanoma who were seen at the University Malaya Medical Centre from 1998 to 2008. Thirty-two patients with cutaneous melanoma were recorded during that period. Of these, 24 had sought treatment at the onset of disease at our centre. Chinese patients constituted the largest group (19 cases). The median age of these 24 patients at the time of presentation was 62 years. 16 patients had melanoma involving the lower limb with 12 affecting the sole of the foot. None had melanoma arising from the face. Histopathology showed nodular melanoma in 22 cases (91.6%), with superficial spreading and acral lentiginous melanoma diagnosed in 1 case each. The majority of patients (62.5%) were found to be in Stage III of the disease at the time of diagnosis.
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Old 27th February 2013, 12:53 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Targeted therapy in melanoma.
Kudchadkar RR, Smalley KS, Glass LF, Trimble JS, Sondak VK.
Clin Dermatol. 2013 Mar;31(2):200-8.
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Since the discovery of activating mutations in the BRAF oncogene in melanoma, there has been remarkable progress in the development of targeted therapies for unresectable and metastatic melanoma. We review the latest developments in our understanding of the role of BRAF/MEK/ERK pathway signaling in melanoma, and the development of inhibitors of this pathway. We also explore alternative mutations seen in melanoma, such as NRAS, KIT, GNAQ, and GNA11, and the drug development that is ongoing based on this biology. Strategies for the management of the vexing clinical problem of BRAF inhibitor resistance, primarily via combination therapy, are outlined. With the recent approval of the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib for stage IV metastatic melanoma, use of this agent is expanding in the United States. Thus, management of the skin toxicities of this agent, such as squamous cell carcinomas, "acneiform" eruptions, hand-foot syndrome, and panniculitis, will be a growing problem facing dermatologists today. We discuss the toxicities of targeted agents in use for melanoma, in particular the dermatologic effects and the management of these skin toxicities.
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Old 11th March 2013, 01:20 AM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Press release:
Aspirin may lower melanoma risk
Quote:
A new study has found that women who take aspirin have a reduced risk of developing melanoma—and that the longer they take it, the lower the risk. The findings suggest that aspirin's anti-inflammatory effects may help protect against this type of skin cancer. The study is published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.

In the Women's Health Initiative, researchers observed US women aged 50 to 79 years for an average of 12 years and noted which individuals developed cancer. At the beginning of the study, the women were asked which medications they took, what they ate, and what activities they performed.

When Jean Tang MD, PhD, of Stanford University School of Medicine in Palo Alto, and her colleagues analyzed available data from 59,806 Caucasian women in the study, they found that women who took more aspirin were less likely to develop melanoma skin cancer during the 12 years of follow up. Overall, women who used aspirin had a 21 percent lower risk of melanoma relative to non-users. Each incremental increase in duration of aspirin use (less than one year of use, one to four years of use, and five or more years of use) was associated with an 11 percent lower risk of melanoma. Thus, women who used aspirin for five or more years had a 30 percent lower melanoma risk than women who did not use aspirin. The researchers controlled for differences in pigmentation, tanning practices, sunscreen use, and other factors that may affect skin cancer risk.

"Aspirin works by reducing inflammation and this may be why using aspirin may lower your risk of developing melanoma," said Dr. Tang. Other pain medications, such as acetaminophen, did not lower women's melanoma risk. Dr. Tang noted that the findings support the design of a clinical trial to directly test whether aspirin can be taken to prevent melanoma.
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Old 15th March 2013, 01:43 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

In situ subungual melanoma: digit salvaging clearance.
Chow WT, Bhat W, Magdub S, Orlando A.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2013 Feb;66(2):274-6.

Quote:
Acral lentiginous melanoma affecting the nail is uncommon but carries a poor prognosis due to difficulties in early diagnosis. The gold standard of treatment for subungual melanoma is biopsy followed by wide local excision in form of amputation of the distal phalanx of the digit, in order to achieve at least 10 mm margin of clearance or by fixed tissue micrographic (Mohs') surgery. Here, we demonstrate a non-amputative approach for the excision of subungual melanoma in situ of the right great toe, involving removal of the nail unit with a layer of underlying bone before reconstruction with full thickness skin graft. This technique allows adequate excision margins to ensure full clearance of the lesion with satisfactory preservation of function
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Old 13th June 2013, 03:01 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Press Release:
Monell-Led Research Identifies Scent of Melanoma
Quote:
PHILADELPHIA (June 13, 2013) — According to new research from the Monell Center and collaborating institutions, odors from human skin cells can be used to identify melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. In addition to detecting a unique odor signature associated with melanoma cells, the researchers also demonstrated that a nanotechnology-based sensor could reliably differentiate melanoma cells from normal skin cells. The findings suggest that non-invasive odor analysis may be a valuable technique in the detection and early diagnosis of human melanoma.

Melanoma is a tumor affecting melanocytes, skin cells that produce the dark pigment that gives skin its color. The disease is responsible for approximately 75 percent of skin cancer deaths, with chances of survival directly related to how early the cancer is detected. Current detection methods most commonly rely on visual inspection of the skin, which is highly dependent on individual self-examination and clinical skill.

The current study took advantage of the fact that human skin produces numerous airborne chemical molecules known as volatile organic compounds, or VOCs, many of which are odorous. “There is a potential wealth of information waiting to be extracted from examination of VOCs associated with various diseases, including cancers, genetic disorders, and viral or bacterial infections,” notes George Preti, PhD, an organic chemist at Monell who is one of the paper’s senior authors.

In the study, published online ahead of print in the Journal of Chromatography B, researchers used sophisticated sampling and analytical techniques to identify VOCs from melanoma cells at three stages of the disease as well as from normal melanocytes. All the cells were grown in culture.

The researchers used an absorbent device to collect chemical compounds from air in closed containers containing the various types of cells. Then, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques were used to analyze the compounds and identified different profiles of VOCs emitting from melanoma cells relative to normal cells.

Both the types and concentrations of chemicals were affected. Melanoma cells produced certain compounds not detected in VOCs from normal melanocytes and also more or less of other chemicals. Further, the different types of melanoma cells could be distinguished from one another.

Noting that translation of these results into the clinical diagnostic realm would require a reliable and portable sensor device, the researchers went on to examine VOCs from normal melanocytes and melanoma cells using a previously described nano-sensor.

Constructed of nano-sized carbon tubes coated with strands of DNA, the tiny sensors can be bioengineered to recognize a wide variety of targets, including specific odor molecules. The nano-sensor was able to distinguish differences in VOCs from normal and several different types of melanoma cells.

“We are excited to see that the DNA-carbon nanotube vapor sensor concept has potential for use as a diagnostic. Our plan is to move forward with research into skin cancer and other diseases,” said A.T. Charlie Johnson, PhD, Professor of Physics at the University of Pennsylvania, who led the development of the olfactory sensor.

Together, the findings provide proof-of-concept regarding the potential of the two analytical techniques to identify and detect biomarkers that distinguish normal melanocytes from different melanoma cell types.

“This study demonstrates the usefulness of examining VOCs from diseases for rapid and noninvasive diagnostic purposes,” said Preti. “The methodology should also allow us to differentiate stages of the disease process.”

Current studies are focusing on analysis of VOCs from tumor sites of patients diagnosed with primary melanoma.

Also contributing to the research were lead author Jae Kwak, Michelle Gallagher, Mehmet Hakan Ozdener, Charles J. Wysocki, Adam Faranda, and Amaka Isamah, all from Monell; A. T. Charlie Johnson, Brett R. Goldsmith, and Steven S. Fakharzadeh from the University of Pennsylvania; and Meenhard Herlyn from The Wistar Institute. Research reported in the publication was supported by The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number T 32 DC00014-26 to Monell. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. Additional funds were donated to the Monell Center by Ms. Bonnie Hunt in memory of her parents, Ida and Percy Hunt. Support for Drs Johnson and Goldsmith came from the University of Pennsylvania Nano/Bio Interface Center through National Science Foundation grant NSEC DMR08-32802.
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Old 24th July 2013, 02:50 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Patient presenting with left arm complaint has hidden melanoma on the sole.
Prath PE, Aires DJ, Squires S.
Dermatol Online J. 2013 Jan 15;19(1):13.
Quote:
Some insurance companies argue that complete skin examination is not justified if the presenting complaint can be fully visualized without having the patient disrobe. This might be especially true if such a patient is a member of a group at relatively lower risk for skin cancer. We present a case in which complete skin examination revealed a large melanoma in situ, indicating that skin examinations can be justified in such patients.
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Old 22nd August 2013, 09:41 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Press Release:
Single injection may revolutionize melanoma treatment, Moffitt study shows
Injectable dye shows promise as possible immunotherapy option for melanoma patients
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A new study at Moffitt Cancer Center could offer hope to people with melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. Researchers are investigating whether an injectable known as PV-10 can shrink tumors and reduce the spread of cancer. PV-10 is a solution developed from Rose Bengal, a water-soluble dye commonly used to stain damaged cells in the eye. Early clinical trials show PV-10 can boost immune response in melanoma tumors, as well as the blood stream.

"Various injection therapies for melanoma have been examined over the past 40 years, but few have shown the promising results we are seeing with PV-10," said Shari Pilon-Thomas, Ph.D., assistant member of Moffitt's Immunology Program.

In the initial study, researchers injected a single dose of PV-10 into mice with melanoma. The result was a significant reduction in the skin cancer lesions, as well as a sizable reduction in melanoma tumors that had spread to the lungs. The researchers said the dye solution appeared to produce a robust anti-tumor immune response and may be safer than existing immunological agents.

"We are currently in the middle of our first human clinical trial of PV-10 for advanced melanoma patients. In addition to monitoring the response of injected melanoma tumors, we are also measuring the boost in the anti-tumor immune cells of patients after injection," explained Amod A. Sarnaik, M.D., assistant member of Moffitt's Cutaneous Oncology Program.
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Old 22nd August 2013, 09:45 PM
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Old 18th September 2013, 01:26 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Malignant skin tumors in benin city, South-South, Nigeria.
Forae GD, Olu-Eddo AN.
Oman Med J. 2013 Sep;28(5):311-5.
Quote:
OBJECTIVE:
Malignant skin tumors rank amongst the most common forms of cancer worldwide and constitute a major challenge in dermatopathology and oncology research. This study aims to determine the frequency and patterns of malignant skin tumors at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria.
METHODS:
A 25-year (1982-2007) retrospective study of surgical day books and slides of all patients presenting with skin lesions was conducted at the Surgical and Pathology Departments of University of Benin Teaching Hospital.
RESULTS:
A total of 694 skin biopsies were seen at the department during the study period; of these, 187 cases were malignant constituting 27% of all skin lesions. The majority of the malignant skin tumors (48%) occurred between the third and fifth decades with a male to female ratio of 1.4:1 and a mean age of 47 ± 29 years. Malignant melanoma was the most common skin malignancy, accounting for (n=61; 33%). Kaposi sarcoma constituted the second majority of the cases (n=56; 30%), with a markedly increased incidence between 2000 and 2008. This was consecutively followed by squamous cell carcinoma (n=45; 24%), basal cell carcinoma (n=18; 10%) and dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (n=7; 4%). The leg and foot were the most common sites for malignant skin tumors.
CONCLUSION:
Malignant melanoma was the most common skin malignancy in this study. However, an increasing incidence of all malignant skin tumors was observed. This was particularly noticeable with Kaposi sarcoma, which may be attributed to the increasing prevalence of HIV/AIDS in Nigeria.
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Old 25th September 2013, 11:46 AM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Why Is Melanoma So Metastatic?
Russell R. Braeuer et al
Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research; Accepted Article
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Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive cancers and can disseminate from a relatively small primary tumor and metastasize to multiple sites, including the lung, liver, brain, bone, and lymph nodes. Elucidating the molecular and genetic changes that take place during the metastatic process has led to a better understanding of why melanoma is so metastatic. Herein, we describe the unique features that distinguish melanoma from other solid tumors and contribute to the malignant phenotype of melanoma cells. For example, although melanoma cells are highly antigenic, they are extremely efficient at evading host immune response. Melanoma cells share numerous cell surface molecules with vascular cells, are highly angiogenic, are mesenchymal in nature, and possess a higher degree of “stemness” than do other solid tumors. Finally, analysis of melanoma mutations has revealed that the gene expression profile of malignant melanoma is different from that of other cancers. Elucidating these molecular and genetic processes in highly metastatic melanoma can lead to the development of improved treatment and individualized therapy options.
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Old 10th December 2013, 01:12 AM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

The Importance of Wound Biopsy in the Accurate Diagnosis of Acral Malignant Melanoma Presenting as a Foot Ulcer
Natalie C. Yin, Mariya Miteva, Donald S. Covington, Paolo Romanelli, Olivera Stojadinovic,
International Journal of Lower Extremity Wounds December 9, 2013
Quote:
Neoplastic changes arising at the sites of chronic, nonhealing wounds are not uncommon; however, they often go undiagnosed. We report a case of rapidly progressing plantar melanoma presenting as a chronic, nonhealing ulcer. A 46-year-old patient presented at a specialized Wound Healing Center with an enlarging painful ulcer on the right heel of 3 months duration. The wound was biopsied and specimens were sent for examination at the Wound Pathology service at the Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami. Histology demonstrated features consistent with acral malignant melanoma. Immunohistochemistry using melanocytic markers MART-1, S-100, HMB-45 revealed positive staining indicating the presence of malignant cells, and D2-40 staining showed lymphatic invasion of the tumor in the wound biopsy specimen. The case presented here underscores the importance of wound biopsying in the diagnosis of malignancies associated with nonhealing wounds.
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Old 10th December 2013, 06:14 AM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Wasn't there talk of Bob Marley succumbing to Acral Lentiginous Melanoma ? Dont know how true it is?
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Old 10th December 2013, 06:20 AM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

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Originally Posted by toughspiders View Post
Wasn't there talk of Bob Marley succumbing to Acral Lentiginous Melanoma ? Dont know how true it is?
indeed:
Quote:
In July 1977, Marley was found to have a type of malignant melanoma under the nail of a toe. Contrary to urban legend, this lesion was not primarily caused by an injury during a football match that year, but was instead a symptom of the already-existing cancer. Marley turned down his doctors' advice to have his toe amputated, citing his religious beliefs. Despite his illness, he continued touring and was in the process of scheduling a world tour in 1980.

The album Uprising was released in May 1980 (produced by Chris Blackwell), on which "Redemption Song" is, in particular, considered to be about Marley coming to terms with his mortality. The band completed a major tour of Europe, where it played its biggest concert to 100,000 people in Milan. After the tour Marley went to America, where he performed two shows at Madison Square Garden as part of the Uprising Tour.

Bob Marley appeared at the Stanley Theater (now called The Benedum Center For The Performing Arts) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on 23 September 1980; it would be his last concert.

Shortly afterwards, Marley's health deteriorated and he became very ill; the cancer had spread throughout his body. The rest of the tour was cancelled and Marley sought treatment at the Bavarian clinic of Josef Issels, where he received a controversial type of cancer therapy (Issels treatment) partly based on avoidance of certain foods, drinks, and other substances. After fighting the cancer without success for eight months Marley boarded a plane for his home in Jamaica.

While flying home from Germany to Jamaica, Marley's vital functions worsened. After landing in Miami, Florida, he was taken to the hospital for immediate medical attention. Bob Marley died on 11 May 1981 at Cedars of Lebanon Hospital in Miami (now University of Miami Hospital); he was 36 years old. The spread of melanoma to his lungs and brain caused his death. His final words to his son Ziggy were "Money can't buy life.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Mar...ness_and_death
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Old 18th December 2013, 01:50 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Treatment outcomes of advanced stage malignant melanoma in hand and foot after amputation in korean patients.
Cho K, Jung ST.
Clin Orthop Surg. 2013 Dec;5(4):314-20.
Quote:
BACKGROUND:
A retrospective study was conducted to review the overall survival and treatment outcomes of high grade melanoma in the extremity to explore the clinical features of malignant melanoma of the hand and foot, and the therapeutic efficacies and survival rate after amputation.
METHODS:
The clinical data of 30 patients with malignant melanoma of the hand and foot (confirmed by pathological examination), who were admitted and treated in our hospital between 2001 and 2010, were analyzed retrospectively. We analyzed variables affecting overall and disease-free survival.
RESULTS:
Thirty patients (18 men and 12 women) treated with an amputation procedure for malignant melanoma in the hand or foot constituted the study cohort. The average age of the patients at the time of diagnosis was 58.7 years. Univariate analysis for overall melanoma survival revealed that diagnosis at over 70 years of age, postoperative lymph node metastasis, and location of the tumor were significant prognostic factors. And on the Kaplan-Meier survival curve, old age, American Joint Committee on Cancer stage and postoperative lymph node metastasis showed statistically significant differences in the 5-year survival rate. Also, amputation with aggressive lymph node dissection showed improved long term survival in advanced stage melanoma.
CONCLUSIONS:
In Korean melanoma patients, for the treatment of high grade melanomas in the extremities after amputation, early diagnosis and postoperative follow-up for evaluation of lymph node metastasis are critical factors for long-term survival. And by performing lymph node dissection during amputation, we may improve the survival rate in advanced stage melanoma patients.
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Old 7th January 2014, 06:59 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Press Release:
New diagnostic and therapeutic techniques show potential for patients with metastasized melanoma
Quote:
Reston, Va. (January 7, 2014) – With low survival rates for patients with metastasized melanoma, accurate staging and effective treatments are critical to extending life. New research published in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine highlights the potential of newly developed radiopharmaceuticals with benzamide for the imaging of metastases and as a targeted systemic therapy.

Malignant melanoma is the fifth most common cancer in men and the sixth most common cancer in women, and its incidence rate is increasing rapidly. It accounts for nearly 80 percent of all deaths related to cutaneous cancer. When discovered early, localized melanoma can be cured by surgical removal. However, this cancer displays a strong tendency to metastasize and has very low survival rates for patients, with fewer than five percent surviving longer than five years.

In the study "123I-BZA2 as a Melanin-Targeted Radiotracer for the Identification of Melanoma Metastases: Results and Perspectives of a Multicenter Phase III Clinical Trial," researchers developed a specific single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiopharmaceutical for malignant melanoma—123I-BZA2. Imaging of patients with metastasized melanoma was then performed with both 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and 123I-BZA2 SPECT to compare the accuracy in staging and restaging.

Eighty-seven patients were examined with a total of 86 metastatic lesions. In the analysis of lesions, the sensitivity for 18F-FDG for diagnosis of melanoma metastases was higher than that of 123I-BZA2 (80 percent vs. 23 percent). The specificity of 18F-FDG, however, was lower than 123I-BAZ2 (54 percent vs. 86 percent). The sensitivity and specificity of 123I-BAZ2 for the diagnosis of melanin-positive lesions were 75 percent and 70 percent, respectively.

"We have demonstrated that 123I-BZA2 tumor accumulation was clearly correlated to melanin content of the melanoma metastases. Thus, 123I -BZA2 could be theoretically used for the diagnosis of melanoma metastases," said Florent Cachin, MD, PhD, lead author of the study. "However, given its low sensitivity due to the high proportion of non-pigmented lesion in the natural course of metastatic melanoma, 123I- IBZA2 cannot be used for melanoma staging. Such results could appear discouraging, but the concept of melanin targeting may offer a real opportunity for therapy."

In the study "Radiopharmaceutical Therapy of Patients with Metastasized Melanoma with the Melanin-Binding Benzamide 131I-BA52," the first use of a melanoma-seeking agent for therapeutic application was analyzed. Researchers used a theranostic approach in which the same molecule was given first as a diagnostic isotope (123I-BA52) to identify the patients possibly profiting from therapy, and then as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical (131I-BA52) for those patients who would benefit. Twenty-six patients were imaged with 123I-BA52, and nine patients were selected for therapy with 131I-BA52.

Some of the patients treated with 131I-BA52 were found to have a survival rate of more than two years. Researchers also found that higher treatment doses would have been tolerated in these patients, as only moderate side effects were observed. "We believe that the tracer could be useful in the setting of a combination therapy in patients with metastasized melanoma, especially when applied in earlier stages of the disease where the melanin production is higher as compared to later stages of the disease," noted Uwe Haberkorn, MD, lead author of the study.

Even though new treatments are now available, the prognosis for patients with metastatic melanoma remains very poor. "Innovative strategies are necessary to improve patients' survival. Research focused on innovating targeted-therapy reflects modern oncology, as new theranostic concepts. This strategy nicely illustrates the future of nuclear medicine oncology," said Cachin.
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Old 31st January 2014, 06:43 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

From Podiatry Today:
Keys To Diagnosing Metastatic Melanoma In The Foot And Ankle
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Old 22nd February 2014, 03:21 PM
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Default Re: Melanoma of the foot

Acral lentiginous melanoma: indolent subtype with long radial growth phase.
Kim JY1, Choi M, Jo SJ, Min HS, Cho KH.
Am J Dermatopathol. 2014 Feb;36(2):142-7.
Quote:
Acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM) is the most common type of cutaneous melanoma in Asian populations. Traditionally, ALM was believed to have a poorer prognosis than other subtypes of cutaneous melanoma because of its aggressive behavior. However, in Asians, there have been several unusual case reports that have shown only subtle melanocytic proliferation despite clinically malignant manifestations. We performed a retrospective study of 13 patients with ALM. We reviewed the clinical histories, histopathologies, and immunohistochemical staining from these patients. Clinically, the lesions were characterized by a brown to black pigmented patch with irregular borders and variegated pigmentation on the sole, heel, or finger. Histopathologically, most specimens revealed only bland scattered proliferation of atypical melanocytes without marked cellular atypia or dermal invasion. However, some of the lesions were suspected to progress to the invasive stage, into the papillary dermis after a long period of time. Although cytological atypia of the melanocytes is not sufficient to ALM in situ, the melanocytic proliferation pattern, dermal inflammation, and correlation with clinical presentation would suffice in making the correct diagnosis of ALM in situ. In these cases, more biopsies of other areas should be recommended for the precise diagnosis and early complete excision in accordance with ALM in situ.
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