Home Forums Marketplace Table of Contents Events Member List Site Map Register Mark Forums Read



Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums, for communication between foot health professionals about podiatry and related topics.

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members (PM), upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, earn CPD points and access many other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisments in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.


Tags:

Lesser toe windlass and forefoot wedging

Reply
Submit Thread >  Submit to Digg Submit to Reddit Submit to Furl Submit to Del.icio.us Submit to Google Submit to Yahoo! This Submit to Technorati Submit to StumbleUpon Submit to Spurl Submit to Netscape  < Submit Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 28th March 2011, 11:06 AM
Simon Spooner's Avatar
Simon Spooner Simon Spooner is offline
Podiatry Arena Veteran
 
About:
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: "I'm sick of flags - whatever colour. There's only one flag - the white flag.": Paul Hewson
Posts: 7,713
Join Date: Aug 2005
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 437
Thanked 1,038 Times in 761 Posts
Default Lesser toe windlass and forefoot wedging

Podiatry Arena members do not see these ads
All,
Some time ago I described a digital dorsiflexion test analogous to Jacks test (Hubscher manoeuvre) for the lesser toes. My observation was that there appears to be variation among individuals as to the response of the foot to dorsiflexing each of the digits in turn as we move from toes 1-5; in some people dorsiflexing each digit in turn might result in foot supination at every digit, whereas in other people there is a transition point, at a certain digit, where the response changes from supination to pronation.

I was just thinking about the use of forefoot wedging, if the wedging dorsiflexes the metatarsal, it might create a functional lesser digit limitus in one or more of the lesser digits, and impact on the supination / pronation moment acting on the foot via that specific digit during gait (dependent on whether dorsiflexion of the digit in question tends to pronate or supinate the foot) I'm thinking there might be implications here for wedge placement depending on what we are trying to achieve at the forefoot during gait. i.e. wedge to either side of the transition point of the digital dorsiflexion response. So if we intentional "block" those digits which provide pronation moment when dorsiflexed by dorsiflexing their metatarsals with a wedge up to the change over digit, this should increase the net supination moment...


So, say for example digits 5, 4, and 3 all tended to pronate the foot during the test and we wanted to decrease the pronation forces coming from the dorsiflexion of these toes via the windlass mechanism we might use a reverse "Mortons" but under mets and toes 3, 4 and 5 (or a kinetic wedge extending under 1 and 2).
Hope that makes sense.
__________________
Who? What? When? Why? Yeah? And? So? What?

"My mission drive is to open up my eyes, 'cause the wicked lies and all the sh!te you say..." http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V4NW5S1UTPQ

"Science is the antidote to the poison of enthusiasm and superstition."
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 28th March 2011, 11:23 AM
Simon Spooner's Avatar
Simon Spooner Simon Spooner is offline
Podiatry Arena Veteran
 
About:
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: "I'm sick of flags - whatever colour. There's only one flag - the white flag.": Paul Hewson
Posts: 7,713
Join Date: Aug 2005
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 437
Thanked 1,038 Times in 761 Posts
Default Re: Lesser toe windlass and forefoot wedging

Also, this has got me thinking about how lesser toe deformities disrupt the lesser digit's contributions to the internal forces of the foot....

Found the original thread where i talked about this http://www.podiatry-arena.com/podiat...ad.php?t=23581 seems I was talking Spooner wedges analogous to Cluffy wedges back then rather extending kinetic wedges etc..
__________________
Who? What? When? Why? Yeah? And? So? What?

"My mission drive is to open up my eyes, 'cause the wicked lies and all the sh!te you say..." http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V4NW5S1UTPQ

"Science is the antidote to the poison of enthusiasm and superstition."
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Translate This Page

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Forefoot varus wedging reduces hallux dorsiflexion? Simon Spooner Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses 20 27th January 2011 02:22 PM
Pressure lesions at apex of lesser toes form running podtiger Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses 6 4th March 2010 06:53 AM
New Research on Walking Biomechanics and Rearfoot Wedging Kevin Kirby Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses 23 1st October 2009 10:53 AM
EVA wedging above 5° Lisapodgirl Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses 11 27th August 2009 11:18 AM
Flexor Tendon Sheath as a Source of Pain in Lesser Metatarsal Overload NewsBot Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses 0 18th March 2009 06:02 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

Finding your way around:

Browse the forums.

Search the site.

Browse the tags.

Search the tags.


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:54 PM.