Home Forums Marketplace Table of Contents Events Member List Site Map Register Mark Forums Read



Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums, for communication between foot health professionals about podiatry and related topics.

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members (PM), upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, earn CPD points and access many other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisments in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.


Tags:

Surgery for mortons neuroma

Reply
Submit Thread >  Submit to Digg Submit to Reddit Submit to Furl Submit to Del.icio.us Submit to Google Submit to Yahoo! This Submit to Technorati Submit to StumbleUpon Submit to Spurl Submit to Netscape  < Submit Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 26th September 2008, 03:15 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,396
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 13
Thanked 580 Times in 470 Posts
Default Surgery for mortons neuroma

Podiatry Arena members do not see these ads
Long-term evaluation of interdigital neuroma treated by surgical excision.
Womack JW, Richardson DR, Murphy GA, Richardson EG, Ishikawa SN.
Foot Ankle Int. 2008 Jun;29(6):574-7.
Quote:
BACKGROUND: We examined a large cohort of patients who had interdigital neurectomy and evaluated their clinical outcomes by using a previously developed scoring system as well as a visual analog scale (VAS). In addition, we wanted to identify risk factors that may lead to poorer outcomes.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review identified 232 patients who had neuroma excision between 1994 and 2004, after failure of conservative treatment. Each patient was contacted via mail and given a Neuroma Clinical Evaluation Score survey as well as a visual analog score. Each patient received a unique identification number, allowing the evaluation process to be single-blinded.

RESULTS: Of the 232 patients contacted, 120 (52%) returned their completed surveys. The average Giannini neuroma score was 53: 61 feet (51%) had good or excellent results, 12 (10%) had fair results, and 48 (40%) had poor results. The average VAS score was 2.5. The only significant (p = 0.027) difference in outcome was the location of the neuroma: second webspace had worse outcomes than third webspace neuromas on both the VAS and neuroma score.

CONCLUSION: This retrospective review identified location in the second webspace as a possible prognostic indicator of poor outcome, but the more important finding may be that outcomes of neuroma excision do not appear to be as successful at long-term followup as previously reported.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to NewsBot For This Useful Post:
Heather J (29th September 2008)
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 26th September 2008, 03:17 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,396
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 13
Thanked 580 Times in 470 Posts
Default Re: Surgery for mortons neuroma

Neurectomy versus neurolysis for Morton's neuroma.
Villas C, Florez B, Alfonso M.
Foot Ankle Int. 2008 Jun;29(6):578-80.
Quote:
BACKGROUND: We evaluated a series of patients who underwent neurectomy or neurolysis for the surgical treatment of Morton's neuroma.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A group of 50 patients (69 feet) who underwent surgery for a symptomatic Morton's neuroma were retrospectively reviewed. Surgery was performed through a dorsal approach in all cases. When the nerve showed macroscopic thickening or the typical pseudoneuroma, it was resected; when the nerve had no macroscopic changes, the intermetatarsal ligament and any other potentially compressive structure were released. In 17 cases, adjacent claw toes were treated.

RESULTS: Nerve thickening (pseudoneuroma) were resected in 46 cases; in the other 23 cases, the nerve was preserved. Total relief from digital nerve related symptoms was obtained in all cases but one in each group. These patients were reoperated on 6 months later by performing a neurectomy in the case where the nerve had been preserved, and a more proximal resection in the case in which the nerve had been resected. Both patients finally achieved complete pain relief.

CONCLUSION: When treating Morton's neuromas surgically, neurolysis can be a valid option when a pseudoneuroma has not developed
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to NewsBot For This Useful Post:
Heather J (29th September 2008)
  #3  
Old 29th September 2008, 10:53 AM
drsarbes's Avatar
drsarbes drsarbes is offline
Podiatry Arena Veteran
 
About:
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Green Bay, WI, USA
Posts: 1,489
Join Date: Sep 2005
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 233 Times in 161 Posts
Default Re: Surgery for mortons neuroma

"second webspace had worse outcomes than third webspace neuromas ..."

Think maybe incorrect preoperative Diagnosis?

I have not seen THAT many 2nd interspace neuromas over the years, but have seen quite a few failed 2nd interspace neuromas resections!!!!
Coincidence? Maybe.

My knee jerk response would be that a certain percentage of 2nd Interspace neuromas are done NOT on neuroma patients but on patients with 2nd MTPJ pathology or even non classic Tarsal Tunnel syndromes.

Steve
__________________
DrSArbes
Fellow American College of Foot & Ankle Surgeons
Board Certified Foot & Ankle Surgery, ABPS
Adjunct Professor OCPM
Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to drsarbes For This Useful Post:
Heather J (6th October 2008)
  #4  
Old 4th October 2008, 12:03 PM
Alank Alank is offline
Member
 
About:
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 17
Join Date: Jun 2006
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 4
Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Default Re: Surgery for mortons neuroma

I agree with Dr. Arbes. We are fortunate to have an excellent radiology dept. at our hospital with high end diagnostic ultrasound equipment and those experienced to read it. They frequently find an intermetatarsal bursa with no neuroma. We have them inject it under US guidance when found. They feel to the patient just like a neuroma. We also find that the US is very good at finding neuromas but not nearly as good at finding inflammatory joint changes. MRI does that better. We recently had a patient seen elsewhere and diagnosed with a 2nd space neuroma that was injected with only brief relief. An MRI showed inflammatory changes in the surrounding soft tissue and MTP joint effusion. He had only mild psoriasis but appears to have been experiencing the first signs of psoriatic arthritis. 2nd MTP joint predislocation syndrome is often misdiagnosed as a 2nd space neuroma.

I don't recall who said it first but, "The wrong operation, perfectly executed is doomed before the first incision is made."
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Alank For This Useful Post:
Heather J (6th October 2008)
  #5  
Old 7th October 2008, 08:22 AM
drsarbes's Avatar
drsarbes drsarbes is offline
Podiatry Arena Veteran
 
About:
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Green Bay, WI, USA
Posts: 1,489
Join Date: Sep 2005
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 233 Times in 161 Posts
Default Re: Surgery for mortons neuroma

One more thing:

"BACKGROUND: We examined a large cohort of patients who had interdigital neurectomy and evaluated their clinical outcomes by using a previously developed scoring system as well as a visual analog scale (VAS). In addition, we wanted to identify risk factors that may lead to poorer outcomes. "

COHORT? Think they could have used a different description, perhaps sampling, population, group, "number", anything.

LARGE COHORT? I picture a large group of ex military men limping around the mall!

Steve
__________________
DrSArbes
Fellow American College of Foot & Ankle Surgeons
Board Certified Foot & Ankle Surgery, ABPS
Adjunct Professor OCPM
Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 2nd June 2009, 03:42 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,396
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 13
Thanked 580 Times in 470 Posts
Default Re: Surgery for mortons neuroma

The outcome of Morton's neurectomy in the treatment of metatarsalgia.
Pace A, Scammell B, Dhar S.
Int Orthop. 2009 May 30. [Epub ahead of print]
Quote:
Morton's neuroma is a common cause of metatarsalgia caused by intermetarsal digital nerve thickening. This study reviews the pathology, presentation, symptoms and signs, and patient satisfaction with surgical treatment. Seventy-eight patients (82 feet) were treated for Morton's metatarsalgia by excision of the interdigital nerve. The patients were followed-up for a mean of 4.6 years (range 0.8-8.1 years) and scored using the Foot Functional Index and the American Orthopedic Foot Ankle Society scoring system. In 74 patients the Foot Functional Index was more than 85 (maximum score 100). Seventy-one patients scored more than 90 on the American Orthopedic Foot Ankle Society scoring system with two patients scoring 100 (maximum score). Postoperatively, 82% reported excellent or good results, 10% had a fair result with restriction of activities or pain and 8% had no improvement at all after surgery while 71% had restrictions with footwear.
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 6th October 2009, 04:45 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,396
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 13
Thanked 580 Times in 470 Posts
Default Re: Surgery for mortons neuroma

Results of operative treatment of double Morton's neuroma in the same foot.
Lee KT, Lee YK, Young KW, Kim HJ, Park SY.
J Orthop Sci. 2009 Sep;14(5):574-8. Epub 2009 Oct 3.
Quote:
BACKGROUND: Double Morton's neuroma in one foot has rarely been reported in the literature.

METHODS: In the current study, the authors treated 11 patients with a total of 14 cases of double Morton's neuroma in one foot. During the research period, 157 cases of Morton's neuroma were treated with surgery. The neuromas were excised through a single skin incision, and all operations occurred within a 17-month period from April 2005 to October 2006.

RESULTS: The mean preoperative AOFAS score was 54 points, and the mean postoperative AOFAS score was 78 points. Seven patients underwent additional foot procedures, and the other half did not. There was no significant difference in improvement in the postoperative AOFAS score between patients treated with a combined procedure and patients treated without a combined procedure. Protective sensation was present postoperatively in most patients, except for the four patients who had hypoesthesia or hyperesthesia. No patients were administered anesthesia.

CONCLUSIONS: We report success in surgical excision of double Morton's neuroma in one foot through a single skin incision, and recommend that in cases of compound diseases, excision of a double Morton's neuroma must be performed as a combination procedure.
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 8th September 2010, 03:33 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,396
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 13
Thanked 580 Times in 470 Posts
Default Re: Surgery for mortons neuroma

The outcome after using two different approaches for excision of Morton's neuroma.
Faraj AA, Hosur A.
Chin Med J (Engl). 2010 Aug;123(16):2195-2198.
Quote:
BACKGROUND: The choice for the surgical approach of interdigital neuroma in the foot is controversial. Plantar approach can leave a painful scar on weight bearing area; hence, some prefer dorsal approach. The aim of the current study was to measure the outcome of interdigital (Morton's) neurectomy performed by a single surgeon using dorsal and plantar approaches.

METHODS: A retrospective review of the patient records of one orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeon identified thirty-six patients (42 feet) who had been treated operatively for a primary, persistently painful interdigital neuroma. The mean follow-up was 18 months. Pain, weight bearing, wound problems and rehabilitation period were studied.

RESULTS: The duration to full weight bearing, return to work, driving and recreational activities were at least one week shorter in the dorsal group. The overall satisfaction for surgery was rated as excellent or good in 85% of the thirty six patients. Scar problems were more troublesome and common in the plantar group. There was residual numbness noticed in twenty feet, the pattern of numbness was quite variable and it was bothersome in only seven feet. There was one recurrence in the plantar group.

CONCLUSIONS: Resection of a symptomatic interdigital neuroma through a dorsal or a plantar approach can result in a good outcome. Dorsal approach, however, is associated with better rehabilitation and less scar problems.
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 9th September 2010, 05:33 AM
W J Liggins W J Liggins is offline
Podiatry Arena Veteran
 
About:
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Warwickshire
Posts: 1,185
Join Date: Oct 2004
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 155
Thanked 337 Times in 231 Posts
Default Re: Surgery for mortons neuroma

Hi Steve

I'm interested. Is not "cohort" the standard descriptor for a sampled population in such a study in the US.A.?

All the best

Bill
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 2nd December 2011, 02:21 AM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,396
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 13
Thanked 580 Times in 470 Posts
Default Re: Surgery for mortons neuroma

Long-Term Results of Neurectomy in the Treatment of Morton's Neuroma: More Than 10 Years' Follow-up
Kyung Tai Lee et al
Foot Ankle Spec December 1, 2011

Quote:
Purpose. The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the long-term follow-up results of neurectomy clinical outcomes and complications in the treatment of Morton’s neuroma.

Materials and methods. A total of 19 patients (19 different feet) were treated for Morton’s neuroma by excision of the interdigital nerve at our institute between May 1997 and May 1999. Thirteen (13 feet) of them were followed up. The 13 patients were female and had an average age of 43 years (range 34-54 years) at the time of the operation. The patients were followed-up for a mean of 10.5 years (range 10.0-12.2 years) and scored using the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) forefoot scoring system and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score. Subjective satisfaction was evaluated at the final follow-up.

Results. Eight patients scored more than 90 on the AOFAS forefoot scoring system. The VAS score was improved in all patients. The mean preoperative VAS score was 8.6 ± 0.8 cm (7-10) and the mean follow-up VAS score was 2.4 ± 1.8cm (0-6), which indicated no significant difference (P > .05). The final follow-up satisfaction results indicated that 4 patients were completely satisfied with the operation, 4 were satisfied with minor reservations, 5 were satisfied with major reservations, and no patient was unsatisfied. Neurectomy to treat Morton’s neuroma had a good satisfaction rate (61%). Eleven of the patients complained of numbness on the plantar aspect of the foot adjacent to the interspace, and 2 of these 11 patients complained of disability induced by severe numbness. There was a complaint of residual pain by 1 patient. There were no skin problems on the operation lesions.

Conclusion. The long-term results of neurectomy clinical outcomes in Morton’s neuroma are slightly worse than the short- and mid-term results.
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 2nd December 2011, 03:04 PM
drsarbes's Avatar
drsarbes drsarbes is offline
Podiatry Arena Veteran
 
About:
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Green Bay, WI, USA
Posts: 1,489
Join Date: Sep 2005
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 233 Times in 161 Posts
Default Re: Surgery for mortons neuroma

13 patients?
This is too small of a sample to have a study.
This is a study of patients over a two year period. If you can't come up with more than 13 patients for your study then you shouldn't be performing a study.

5 patients were satisfied with major reservations.
What the heck does that mean.

I hope my tax dollars didn't help pay for this.


Steve
__________________
DrSArbes
Fellow American College of Foot & Ankle Surgeons
Board Certified Foot & Ankle Surgery, ABPS
Adjunct Professor OCPM
Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 2nd December 2011, 03:28 PM
Kevin Kirby's Avatar
Kevin Kirby Kevin Kirby is offline
Podiatry Arena Veteran
Most Valuable Poster (MVP)
 
About:
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 7,455
Join Date: Nov 2004
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 402
Thanked 2,114 Times in 1,162 Posts
Default Re: Surgery for mortons neuroma

Last week I saw a 62 year old man that I performed a left 3rd intermetatarsal neurectomy on over 25 years ago. He hasn't had pain in this area of his foot since the surgery and thought he thought it was a great surgery for him. Good to see these people after all these years to know that I must have been doing something right during that first year of practice.
__________________
Sincerely,

Kevin

**************************************************
Kevin A. Kirby, DPM
Adjunct Associate Professor
Department of Applied Biomechanics
California School of Podiatric Medicine at Samuel Merritt College

E-mail: kevinakirby@comcast.net
Website: www.KirbyPodiatry.com

Private Practice:
107 Scripps Drive, Suite 200
Sacramento, CA 95825 USA
My location

Voice: (916) 925-8111 Fax: (916) 925-8136
**************************************************
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 8th December 2011, 01:05 AM
Frederick George Frederick George is offline
Senior Member
 
About:
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Christchurch, New Zealand
Posts: 156
Join Date: Mar 2008
Marketplace reputation 0% (0)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Default Re: Surgery for mortons neuroma

When only half of the cohort send back the questionnaire that tells you something.

Patients who are unhappy are something like 8 times as likely to respond.

Cheers
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 16th July 2013, 02:51 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,396
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 13
Thanked 580 Times in 470 Posts
Default Re: Surgery for mortons neuroma

Surgical treatment of Morton's neuroma: clinical results after open excision.
Kasparek M, Schneider W.
Int Orthop. 2013 Jul 13.
Quote:
PURPOSE:
Long-term results following surgical treatment of Morton neuroma are rare. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate patients after excision of Morton's neuroma at least ten years following surgery.
METHODS:
We performed a retrospective review of the patients' records who underwent excision of an interdigital neuroma with the clinical diagnosis of Morton's neuroma. Eighty-one patients who had undergone surgery on 98 feet were analysed at an average of 15.3 years postoperatively. In total 111 neuromas were excised, because in 13 feet more than one neuroma was identified clinically. Follow-up evaluation included physical examination and a radiographic evaluation. The interdigital neuroma clinical evaluation score and the AOFAS score were assessed.
RESULTS:
An excellent result was reported for 44 feet (44.9 %), a good result for 31 feet (31.6 %) and a fair one for 15 feet (15,3 %). Eight feet had a poor result (8.2 %), in all of them an amputation neuroma was diagnosed. The average neuroma score was 62 points (range 20-80) and the AOFAS score 75 points (range 29-100). Sixty-one feet (62.2 %) had concomitant foot and ankle disorders not related to the primary diagnosis of Morton's neuroma. Numbness was assessed in 72 % (72 feet), a normal sensibility in 26 % (26 feet) and dyaesthesia in 1 % (one foot). The clinical outcome was not influenced by existence of sensory deficits (p = 0.646); analysis of location of neuroma showed best results for those in the third webspace. A significantly worse outcome was found in patients operated on multiple neuromas compared to single neuroma (p = 0.038).
CONCLUSION:
Surgical excision of a Morton's neuroma results in good clinical results and high overall patient's satisfaction in the long term. Multiple neuromas have worse outcome than single neuromas. Sensory deficits and concomitant foot and ankles disorders are common, but do not have an influence on patient's satisfaction.
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 26th July 2013, 11:01 PM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,396
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 13
Thanked 580 Times in 470 Posts
Default Re: Surgery for mortons neuroma

Metatarsal Shortening Osteotomy for Decompression of Morton’s Neuroma
Eui Hyun Park, Yong Sang Kim, Ho Jin Lee, Yong Gon Koh
Foot & Ankle International July 26, 2013 1071100713499905
Quote:
Background: Among the various operative treatments of Morton’s neuroma, deep transverse metatarsal ligament (DTML) release has been performed for decompression of neuroma. However, the main lesion of Morton’s neuroma is located between the metatarsal head and the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint and more distal than the DTML. Hence we performed the metatarsal shortening osteotomy along with DTML release for decompression of neuroma, and investigated the clinical outcomes of it and compared the outcomes with those of DTML release alone.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 84 consecutive patients (86 neuromas) who underwent surgery for a Morton’s neuroma between February 2008 and March 2011. The first 46 neuroma (group A) were treated with DTML release alone, and the next 40 neuroma (group B) underwent the metatarsal shortening osteotomy with DTML release. Clinical outcomes were compared between the groups and the associations between clinical outcomes and neuroma size were assessed.

Results: Clinical outcomes were significantly improved after surgery in both groups but there were significant differences in clinical outcomes between the 2 groups at final follow-up. There were significant correlations between neuroma size and outcomes in group A, whereas no significant correlations were found between neuroma size and outcomes in group B.

Conclusion: The metatarsal shortening osteotomy with DTML release resulted in better outcomes compared with DTML release alone in patients with Morton’s neuromas.
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 11th February 2014, 11:53 AM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,396
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 13
Thanked 580 Times in 470 Posts
Default Re: Surgery for mortons neuroma

Minimally invasive endoscopic decompression of the intermatatarsal nerve for Morton's neuroma
Mitsuaki Kubota et al
Journal of Orthopaedics; Available online 31 January 2014
Quote:
Background
We presented case reports of endoscopic decompression for a Morton intermetatarsal neuroma.

Methods
Three patients underwent surgery using an instrument designed to release the transverse carpal ligament for carpal tunnel syndrome. Each patient was 61, 56 and 24 years old. The mean follow up period was 1.5 years.

Results
All patients experienced reduced pain postoperatively. The postoperative scar was very small (only 1 cm). There is no loss of sensation, no hematoma and no infection.

Conclusion
This procedure is simple, and the postoperative morbidity for the patient is minimal. There is rapid recovery with minimal risk of complications that are associated with open techniques. Therefore endoscopic decompression for Morton neuroma offers many advantages and should be studied in a larger number of patients.
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 12th July 2014, 12:11 AM
NewsBot's Avatar
NewsBot NewsBot is offline
The Admin that posts the news.
 
About:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The Zoo, where all good monkeys should be
Posts: 13,396
Join Date: Jan 2006
Marketplace reputation 53% (0)
Thanks: 13
Thanked 580 Times in 470 Posts
Default Re: Surgery for mortons neuroma

Morton’s neuroma neuro-osteodesis through a plantar approach
Ahmed Shams, Mohamed M. H. El-Sayed
European Orthopaedics and Traumatology; July 2014
Quote:
Background
Morton’s neuroma is an entrapment neuropathy. Several surgical techniques were proposed for the management of this painful condition and to potentially limit the stump neuroma formation with variable results including attempts to seal the end of the nerve with cryogenic freezing, cauterization, electrocoagulation, carbon dioxide laser, chemical sclerosis, mechanical crush or ligation, fascial capping, and synthetic capping with methyl methacrylate, cellophane, collodion, silicone, glass, tin, tantalum, and silver and gold foils.
Patients & Methods
In this study, 18 patients with Morton’s metatarsalgia were treated using a plantar approach, and neuro-osteodesis that entails burring the nerve into adjacent bone.
Results
All patients had satisfactory results except one case that necessitated a second surgery. Twelve patients were completely satisfied and five were satisfied with minor reservations.
Conclusions
Based on the results provided by this prospective study, we believe that neuro-osteodesis through a plantar approach is expected to be a satisfactory measure for the management of this painful foot condition.
Thread Starter
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Translate This Page

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Forefoot Post Extended To Sulcus Or 1st Ray Cut-out And Reverse Mortons Extension footdoctor Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses 6 17th February 2009 09:48 AM
Endoscopic style surgery for neuroma? GarethNZ Foot Surgery 13 5th November 2008 06:28 PM
Mortons neuroma Admin2 Foot Health Forum 0 28th June 2008 06:50 AM
Advice for possible mortons... brevis Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses 2 30th May 2008 01:39 PM
Mortons Neuroma podomania Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses 8 22nd September 2007 02:34 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

Finding your way around:

Browse the forums.

Search the site.

Browse the tags.

Search the tags.


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:56 PM.