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Stress fractures following knee replacement surgery

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Old 13th December 2012, 11:23 AM
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Default Stress fractures following knee replacement surgery

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Stress fracture of the first metatarsal after total knee arthroplasty: Two case reports using gait analysis.
Harato K, Ozaki M, Sakurai A, Kudo Y, Otani T.
Knee. 2012 Dec 9.
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Stress fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) occur mainly in patients with considerable deformity of the knee. In addition, the majority of these fractures after TKA involve the hip joint. We present two cases of stress fractures of the first metatarsal after TKA in patients with severe varus deformity. Correction of leg alignment and pain reduction obtained by TKA lead to stress fracture of the bone. Gait analysis was carried out for both cases in order to clarify the gait characteristics of the stress fracture. As a result, side-to-side differences of the distance between first metatarsal and foot center of pressure in the coronal plane were observed using gait analysis in these patients. Fortunately, conservative treatment was successful for these patients. Stress fractures should be considered when a patient who had a considerable severe deformity of the knee preoperatively complains of foot pain on the affected side. Contrary to stress fractures at the hip joint, patients with the fracture of the first metatarsal can be treated without surgery.
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Old 13th December 2012, 11:28 AM
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Default Re: Stress fractures following knee replacement surgery

Related thread:
Foot loading following knee arthroplasty
Shoe Recommendation for Total Knee Replacement
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Old 17th January 2014, 10:00 PM
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Default Re: Stress fractures following knee replacement surgery

Calcaneal stress fracture: an adverse event following total hip and total knee arthroplasty: a report of five cases.
Miki T, Miki T, Nishiyama A.
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2014 Jan 15;96(2):e9. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.L.01472.
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BACKGROUND:
Stress fractures have been reported to occur in the pubis, femoral neck, proximal part of the tibia, and fabella during the postoperative period following total knee or total hip arthroplasty. However, to our knowledge, calcaneal stress fractures after total hip or total knee arthroplasty have not been reported in the English-language literature. Most orthopaedic surgeons are not familiar with calcaneal stress fractures that may occur in elderly patients after a total knee or total hip arthroplasty.
METHODS:
We retrospectively reviewed the clinical features, imaging findings, and bone mineral content of the proximal part of the femur and the distal end of the radius in five patients who had a calcaneal stress fracture after a total knee or total hip arthroplasty.
RESULTS:
All patients were women with a mean age of 76.8 years. All fractures occurred in the calcaneus on the same side as the arthroplasty. The fracture appeared at a mean of 10.2 weeks postoperatively. All patients reported heel pain on walking. Swelling and local heat were found in four and three patients, respectively. Pain was elicited by squeezing the calcaneus in all patients. Early radiographs had normal findings in two patients, and an irregular sclerotic line appeared later in the radiographs of all patients. All fractures were treated conservatively. Four fractures healed uneventfully, but one fracture displaced. All patients had osteoporosis.
CONCLUSIONS:
Calcaneal stress fractures during the postoperative period following total knee or total hip arthroplasty may not be as rare as previously thought. Because clinical symptoms of the fracture appear insidiously and radiographic findings are absent or subtle in the early stage, a high index of suspicion is needed for orthopaedic surgeons to make the correct diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging or repeated radiographs may be necessary to make the correct diagnosis when no abnormality is apparent on the initial radiograph.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:
Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PEER REVIEW This article was reviewed by the Editor-in-Chief and one Deputy Editor, and it underwent blinded review by two or more outside experts. The Deputy Editor reviewed each revision of the article, and it underwent a final review by the Editor-in-Chief prior to publication. Final corrections and clarifications occurred during one or more exchanges between the author(s) and copyeditors.
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